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Reply #30 posted 02/07/17 12:53pm

databank

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imprimis said:

databank said:

In 1984 to be precise. IDK the exact release date but all sources concur to say 1984, so I'd assume early 84. Oddly enough it seems the OST was released at around the same time the VHS was released, not at the time the movie was released in theatres.

I doubt it had much to do with anything though, Risky Business was far from being a major movie and its soundtrack far from being a major charts hit.

.

Amazon is giving an original release date of August 5, 1983. The first 1999 CD release occurred in 1984, if I am not mistaken, as a Japan/obi release. I believe 'Risky Business' was pop culturally significant, in the United States at least, and the inclusion of DMSR is a small case-in-point reflecting the ascendancy of Prince's stardom in 1983 going into 1984. DMSR was never poised to be a single, however, and other markets found no problem releasing abridged albums as '1999 I' and '1999 II'. DMSR seems to have been on the upswing since the mid-2000s. For many years (certainly much of the 1990s/early 2000s), it seemed that Black audiences criticized the song as too long and instrumental, and White audiences as too 'Black'. It's good to see reinforced that this essential song is more staunchly defended and better received these days. It felt missing from the PR Tour, and the Parade/LS-era teases of it were unsatisfactory.

.

[Edited 2/7/17 12:36pm]

Amazon release dates for products dating to before Amazon existed are never to be trusted, I did so when I began working on the discography then realized they were most of the time contradicted by other, more reliable sources. August 5 1983 is the release date of the movie, not the OST. In that case where Amazon got the date is easy to figger out, in other cases I have no clue, it's a big WTF because dates seem plainly made up.

It's possible RB was impactful in the US, it made no lasting impression in France and I'd never heard of it before I learned about that DMSR edit in 2010, it's a really cool movie though. Now was its soundtrack impactful in the US? IDK but the fact that it was released as an afterthought and without a hit single makes me assume it wasn't, at least not in the way OST's like Flashdance, Footloose, Top Gun or Beverly Hills Cop 1 and 2 were back then.

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Reply #31 posted 02/07/17 1:08pm

laurarichardso
n

imprimis said:



databank said:




imprimis said:



.


Its removal may have seemed the best of all possible worlds sacrifice at the time, in that it was available on the 'Risky Business' soundtrack in 1983.


.



In 1984 to be precise. IDK the exact release date but all sources concur to say 1984, so I'd assume early 84. Oddly enough it seems the OST was released at around the same time the VHS was released, not at the time the movie was released in theatres.


I doubt it had much to do with anything though, Risky Business was far from being a major movie and its soundtrack far from being a major charts hit.



.


Amazon is giving an original release date of August 5, 1983. The first 1999 CD release occurred in 1984, if I am not mistaken, as a Japan/obi release. I believe 'Risky Business' was pop culturally significant, in the United States at least, and the inclusion of DMSR is a small case-in-point reflecting the ascendancy of Prince's stardom in 1983 going into 1984. DMSR was never poised to be a single, however, and other markets found no problem releasing abridged albums as '1999 I' and '1999 II'. DMSR seems to have been on the upswing since the mid-2000s. For many years (certainly much of the 1990s/early 2000s), it seemed that Black audiences criticized the song as too long and instrumental, and White audiences as too 'Black'. It's good to see reinforced that this essential song is more staunchly defended and better received these days. It felt missing from the PR Tour, and the Parade/LS-era teases of it were unsatisfactory.


.

[Edited 2/7/17 12:36pm]


-/Are you the spokesperson for black people? Because have been black all my life and I never heard anyone say such a thing. When he performed that sibd on the Musicolgy tour people went nuts both black and white. More org crazy.
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Reply #32 posted 02/07/17 2:16pm

djThunderfunk

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imprimis said:

laurarichardson said:

TrivialPursuit said: -/Yes, they could not fit all the songs on the CD do some genius at WB cut DMSR.

.

Its removal may have seemed the best of all possible worlds sacrifice at the time, in that it was available on the 'Risky Business' soundtrack in 1983.

.


Yeah, but IIRC, Risky Business was at the time only available on CD as an import in the U.S., and, it was an edit of the album version as well.

Censorship is ALWAYS wrong, no matter who is doing it or how noble their motivation.
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Reply #33 posted 02/07/17 2:19pm

djThunderfunk

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imprimis said:

databank said:

In 1984 to be precise. IDK the exact release date but all sources concur to say 1984, so I'd assume early 84. Oddly enough it seems the OST was released at around the same time the VHS was released, not at the time the movie was released in theatres.

I doubt it had much to do with anything though, Risky Business was far from being a major movie and its soundtrack far from being a major charts hit.

.

Amazon is giving an original release date of August 5, 1983. The first 1999 CD release occurred in 1984, if I am not mistaken, as a Japan/obi release. I believe 'Risky Business' was pop culturally significant, in the United States at least, and the inclusion of DMSR is a small case-in-point reflecting the ascendancy of Prince's stardom in 1983 going into 1984. DMSR was never poised to be a single, however, and other markets found no problem releasing abridged albums as '1999 I' and '1999 II'. DMSR seems to have been on the upswing since the mid-2000s. For many years (certainly much of the 1990s/early 2000s), it seemed that Black audiences criticized the song as too long and instrumental, and White audiences as too 'Black'. It's good to see reinforced that this essential song is more staunchly defended and better received these days. It felt missing from the PR Tour, and the Parade/LS-era teases of it were unsatisfactory.

.

[Edited 2/7/17 12:36pm]


Really?!? It's been among my favorites since the album came out.
When the CD came out without it I was amazed that they chose to remove "the best song on the album".
Since then Lady Cab Driver has edged it out as favorite for me.

Censorship is ALWAYS wrong, no matter who is doing it or how noble their motivation.
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Reply #34 posted 02/07/17 2:40pm

sulls

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OnlyNDaUsa said:



dannyd5050 said:


What is the last thing Prince sings at the end of the song?



"Why on earth can't you just pick up the phone? You know I don't like to be alone. Why? Why must you torture me?"



That's all I've ever been able to make out.



Anyone else?





something about marvin gay and the kids....




falloff
"I like to watch."
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Reply #35 posted 02/07/17 2:45pm

sulls

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dannyd5050 said:

What is the last thing Prince sings at the end of the song?



"Why on earth can't you just pick up the phone? You know I don't like to be alone. Why? Why must you torture me?"



That's all I've ever been able to make out.



Anyone else?



It sounds to me like "why u wanna treat me so bad". Anyone else hear that?
"I like to watch."
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Reply #36 posted 02/07/17 2:59pm

TrivialPursuit

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sulls said:

dannyd5050 said:

What is the last thing Prince sings at the end of the song?

"Why on earth can't you just pick up the phone? You know I don't like to be alone. Why? Why must you torture me?"

That's all I've ever been able to make out.

Anyone else?

It sounds to me like "why u wanna treat me so bad". Anyone else hear that?

Why on Earth can't U just pick up the phone, yeah?
U know I don't like 2 be alone {fade out}
Why, why must U torture me baby?
Why U gotta treat me so bad?

Just when U think U've got more than enough, that's when it all up and flies away.
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Reply #37 posted 02/07/17 3:01pm

tomds

TrivialPursuit said:



laurarichardson said:




imprimis said:


Does anyone find this mostly Euro release cassette to be a better presentation of the album than other configurations?


.


[Edited 2/7/17 10:56am]



No, what fool would take DMSR off.




They did on the CD when it first came out in like 1987 or so. There's a note on the back of the CD case noting it, too. I was so pissed when I saw that for the first time. I didn't buy it. Ironically about a year or two ago, I found that CD in a record store and bought it. So I have both US versions now, with and without "DMSR". I suppose that's when CDs only went to 74 minutes or so, and 1999 was beyond that.



really ? I thought it was "only" 70mins
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Reply #38 posted 02/07/17 3:07pm

epronk

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Reply #39 posted 02/07/17 4:00pm

imprimis

I apologize for making such a shaky, and unqualified generalization. I didn't mean to offend, or implicate such sensitive subject matter. It was my own experience, one that was borne out dozens of times, that this song was considered quite 'uncool' 1992-2001, even on alt.music.prince and other fa[m/n] venues. I tried hard to get many on board, and was laughed at for advocating this song, even by those of the right age when 1999 was current. This was before ONA, Musicology, and the general mainstream re-embrace of 1980s musical production tropes beginning especially during the mid-2000s. This was a time period where some claimed Love Symbol and Emancipation were artistically his best. Basically too 'New Wavy' and repetitive for something entering into the Dazz Band or Midnight Star area of funk, and not pop enough (and too weird, before Prince was a household name) to make it to a single 1982-1984, and old school was generally treacherous waters, was where the [non]consensus seemed to fall at that time. I do believe it is perhaps the best track on the album; it received fantastic treatment at the Detroit '82 Masonic Temple performance and of course as reinterpreted in Small Club, and was chosen as extended encore to the August '83 First Avenue Benefit Performance for good reason.

.

[Edited 2/8/17 6:06am]

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Reply #40 posted 02/07/17 5:36pm

laurarichardso
n

imprimis said:

laurarichardson said:

imprimis said: -/Are you the spokesperson for black people? Because have been black all my life and I never heard anyone say such a thing. When he performed that sibd on the Musicolgy tour people went nuts both black and white. More org crazy.

.

I apologize for making such a shaky, and unqualified generalization. I didn't mean to offend, or implicate such sensitive subject matter. It was my own experience, one that was borne out dozens of times, that this song was considered quite 'uncool' 1992-2001, even on alt.music.prince and other fa[m/n] venues. I tried hard to get many on board, and was laughed at for advocating this song, even by those of the right age when 1999 was current. This was before ONA, Musicology, and the general mainstream re-embrace of 1980s musical production tropes beginning especially during the mid-2000s. This was a time period where some claimed Love Symbol and Emancipation were artistically his best. Basically too 'New Wavy' and repetitive for something entering into the Dazz Band or Midnight Star area of funk, and not pop enough (and too weird, before Prince was a household name) to make it to a single 1982-1984, and old school was generally treacherous waters, was where the [non]consensus seemed to fall at that time. I do believe it is perhaps the best track on the album; it received fantastic treatment at the Detroit '82 Masonic Temple performance and of course as reinterpreted in Small Club, and was chosen as extended encore to the August '83 First Avenue Benefit Performance for good reason.

.

[Edited 2/7/17 16:48pm]

alt.music.prince Well that tells you everything you need to know. A bunch of square Sir Void of funk people. This song was very popular with young blacks when it came out. Morris Day has put the song in his set because it rocks as a concert rocker.

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Reply #41 posted 02/07/17 6:32pm

OnlyNDaUsa

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DMSR was one of my early favorites! That and Just as Long... were my jams! (do they still say that? you know the cool kids... now that i think of it...did they ever?)

oh and i was big into AMP and the PML! I wish it was better archived!

The Spike is Real Wear a Mask (this is not the 2nd Wave)
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Reply #42 posted 02/07/17 6:58pm

luvsexy4all

how..talk about completists....how about the end of moonbeam levels on the bootleg CO2??? is THAT legit ?

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Reply #43 posted 02/07/17 7:22pm

databank

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luvsexy4all said:

how..talk about completists....how about the end of moonbeam levels on the bootleg CO2??? is THAT legit ?

I know only of 2 ML: the one on 4ever and the one with the FX sound at the beginning. However I may have missed a third one. There were talks of a piano coda at the end being there on some versions and not on others, not sure what it means as both the versions I have end the same as far as I can tell.

A COMPREHENSIVE PRINCE DISCOGRAPHY (work in progress ^^): https://sites.google.com/...iscog/home
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Reply #44 posted 02/07/17 7:28pm

luvsexy4all

databank said:

luvsexy4all said:

how..talk about completists....how about the end of moonbeam levels on the bootleg CO2??? is THAT legit ?

I know only of 2 ML: the one on 4ever and the one with the FX sound at the beginning. However I may have missed a third one. There were talks of a piano coda at the end being there on some versions and not on others, not sure what it means as both the versions I have end the same as far as I can tell.

yes a piano thing with rain fall

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Reply #45 posted 02/08/17 2:02am

imprimis

On the ancient (circa 1989) vinyl bootleg 'A Better Place 2 Die', ML's coda does continue several seconds longer, with with some trailing piano and that flangy sci-fi synth patch. I'm not certain any other boot has this version, or back-sourced this version (aside from a latter CD re-release of ABP2D), although it was long ago the most commonly traded MP3 'rip' of ML.

.

The other circulating versions (of which there are at least two, from the obsessive completist's standpoint, including the official release), obviously have been edited to fade out slightly earlier.

.

The track seems more haunting and reflective with the added length to its coda, and would have been a good way to end a side of an LP, if this had made 1999. If the song were wedged between other tracks, perhaps the edit would be more sensible.

.

Allegedly intended at one point to be sequenced after or segue from 1999 (where 'Little Red Corvette' is now placed), but that claim seems to be mainly on account of the 'nuclear theme' and that beginning white noise patch (which resembles the 'bomb blast' at the ending of 1999-- but he also uses it on 'Automatic', 'International Lover', the opening to 'Purple Rain' album version, 'The Belle of St Mark', 'Crystal Ball', etc.), although it would probably work thematically and one shouldn't rule it out the possibility that it was configured that way at one point.

.

[Edited 2/8/17 2:28am]

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Forums > Prince: Music and More > Does anyone have the 1983 cassette of 1999 with How Come U Don't Call Me?