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Thread started 07/03/16 12:45am

MattyJam

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Do all Prince fans rate D'angelo?

I mean, maybe it's just me, but I've never seen the appeal. I've heard the first two albums and much of it is self-indulgent and meandering. And I'm sorry, but I don't even think he's that funky! Give me the far superior (and more original) Van Hunt any day.

He seems to think that by gathering together as many ex-Prince musicians as possible that it will somehow turn him into the real deal, but he can play with Jesse and Blackwell till the cows come home, he'll still be nothing more than a pale imitator. He buries his vocals in the mix to disguise the fact that he actually has fairly limited chops as a vocalist. His songwriting is either pastiche, or just loose sketches of ideas and I've yet to hear any real skill from him as an instrumentalist.

Am I the only Prince fan who doesn't rate this ridiculously overrated cat?
[Edited 7/3/16 0:50am]
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Reply #1 posted 07/03/16 12:57am

suomynona

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[Troll snip - luv4u]

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Reply #2 posted 07/03/16 1:02am

NorthC

No, you're not. I heared the first single Brown Sugar and thought, that's a Rolling Stones song. And the track wasn't so good that I wanted to hear more. But I never was a big fan of this "nu soul" that was popular in the 90s. I didn't find it very original.
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Reply #3 posted 07/03/16 1:04am

suomynona

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[Troll snip - luv4u]

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Reply #4 posted 07/03/16 1:37am

MattyJam

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^^ And here come the butthurt D'angelo fans. Lol.

I love plenty of artists outside of Prince. But none of the other artists I like are trying to be Prince.
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Reply #5 posted 07/03/16 1:54am

Replica

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Love his music, and have no problem liking it even though the Prince influence is impossible to not hear, as he in some ways are trying to channel his inner Prince through "modern" filters. Despite the obvious over the top influence, he still manages to sound more original than most other artists. He more or less invented his own "swamp funk" and has a freakin awesome voice. It's limited compared to Prince yeah, but his control and power within his reach and style sound a whole lot fuller, more gospel and more pure soul genre ish than a Prince would ever be able to. I heard him in 2012 live if I'm not wrong. He seriously murdered vocally. But yeah, he is a bit limited when it comes to textures and style. Still amazing though. And not all artists has to be multi talents like Prince.
[Edited 7/3/16 1:55am]
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Reply #6 posted 07/03/16 3:52am

WhisperingDand
elions

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NorthC said:

I never was a big fan of this "nu soul" that was popular in the 90s. I didn't find it very original.

This is understandable. A lot of "neo soul" sounds a little too intentionally throwback for my tastes, usually with the notable exception of material produced by the widely-cited creator of the genre (and the person who produced some of the original demos for D'Angelo's Voodoo album), J Dilla. That guy was taking it to the next level artistically, the other stuff is usually solidly constructed but almost overly nostaglic.


To me, though, I could never see the Prince/D'Angelo comparisons, because like OP said, the songs and vocals kind of meander, while Prince's songs were always super tight and compact even if they went long jam style. Plus, only three records in 20 years? Prince has side-projects with more recorded output... it's no biggie, just not very Prince-like.



I get more of a Prince vibe from Dilla, honestly. Multi-instrumentalist, did everything on his productions, super-prolific with tons of unreleased music (and very little sleep), so passionate about music that he continued making art while he was literally dying in his hospital bed. And most Prince-like of all, it's very original and diverse, from easily accessible to kinda weird/out there...

[Edited 7/3/16 3:57am]

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Reply #7 posted 07/03/16 4:11am

Replica

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WhisperingDandelions said:

NorthC said:

I never was a big fan of this "nu soul" that was popular in the 90s. I didn't find it very original.

This is understandable. A lot of "neo soul" sounds a little too intentionally throwback for my tastes, usually with the notable exception of material produced by the widely-cited creator of the genre (and the person who produced some of the original demos for D'Angelo's Voodoo album), J Dilla. That guy was taking it to the next level artistically, the other stuff is usually solidly constructed but almost overly nostaglic.


To me, though, I could never see the Prince/D'Angelo comparisons, because like OP said, the songs and vocals kind of meander, while Prince's songs were always super tight and compact even if they went long jam style. Plus, only three records in 20 years? Prince has side-projects with more recorded output... it's no biggie, just not very Prince-like.



I get more of a Prince vibe from Dilla, honestly. Multi-instrumentalist, did everything on his productions, super-prolific with tons of unreleased music (and very little sleep), so passionate about music that he continued making art while he was literally dying in his hospital bed. And most Prince-like of all, it's very original and diverse, from easily accessible to kinda weird/out there...

[Edited 7/3/16 3:57am]

Being a multi instrumentalist doesn't make you Prince-like lol

It makes you a... wait for it... drum roll... multi instrumentalist! There's a bunch of multi instrumentalists, and a few that can pull it off as a one man band. The new artist Jacob Collier can play almost anything, and sings with a freaking huge vocal register, but doesn't sound like Prince at all. The sound Dilla had, is not similar to Prince, compared to how similar D'angelo sounds. D'angelo sounds like a mix between marvin gaye, curtis mayfield, prince, al green and sly stone. But the Prince influence takes so much space in his world, that he even adds old Prince band members to his crew, uses the linn-ish clap on the 8, samples the Parad album, does his piano medleys like Prince did it in the Lovesexy tour... leans on the piano with makeup around his eys while he flirts with the audience, teases them, walks away from the piano... screams like james brown on long funk wamps...

I've seen his live performances twice with my own two eyes, and I've studied his style. I truly love his music. But it's clearly not trying to hide the fact that he is the biggest fanboy ever. I respect that though. I wouldn't hide it too much either. I'd just probably try to add some more falvour to it lol

[Edited 7/3/16 4:12am]

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Reply #8 posted 07/03/16 4:36am

WhisperingDand
elions

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Replica said:

WhisperingDandelions said:

This is understandable. A lot of "neo soul" sounds a little too intentionally throwback for my tastes, usually with the notable exception of material produced by the widely-cited creator of the genre (and the person who produced some of the original demos for D'Angelo's Voodoo album), J Dilla. That guy was taking it to the next level artistically, the other stuff is usually solidly constructed but almost overly nostaglic.


To me, though, I could never see the Prince/D'Angelo comparisons, because like OP said, the songs and vocals kind of meander, while Prince's songs were always super tight and compact even if they went long jam style. Plus, only three records in 20 years? Prince has side-projects with more recorded output... it's no biggie, just not very Prince-like.



I get more of a Prince vibe from Dilla, honestly. Multi-instrumentalist, did everything on his productions, super-prolific with tons of unreleased music (and very little sleep), so passionate about music that he continued making art while he was literally dying in his hospital bed. And most Prince-like of all, it's very original and diverse, from easily accessible to kinda weird/out there...

[Edited 7/3/16 3:57am]

Being a multi instrumentalist doesn't make you Prince-like lol

It makes you a... wait for it... drum roll... multi instrumentalist! There's a bunch of multi instrumentalists, and a few that can pull it off as a one man band. The new artist Jacob Collier can play almost anything, and sings with a freaking huge vocal register, but doesn't sound like Prince at all. The sound Dilla had, is not similar to Prince, compared to how similar D'angelo sounds. D'angelo sounds like a mix between marvin gaye, curtis mayfield, prince, al green and sly stone. But the Prince influence takes so much space in his world, that he even adds old Prince band members to his crew, uses the linn-ish clap on the 8, samples the Parad album, does his piano medleys like Prince did it in the Lovesexy tour... leans on the piano with makeup around his eys while he flirts with the audience, teases them, walks away from the piano... screams like james brown on long funk wamps...

I've seen his live performances twice with my own two eyes, and I've studied his style. I truly love his music. But it's clearly not trying to hide the fact that he is the biggest fanboy ever. I respect that though. I wouldn't hide it too much either. I'd just probably try to add some more falvour to it lol

[Edited 7/3/16 4:12am]

Ha, okay, touché, but I didn't just say multi-instrumentalist and just leave it at that. There was a couple other qualities there, you know.

But I realize I was running off on my own tangent with my own definition of "Prince-like," which is more what I think of Prince as, like, as his own artist in music. Like what you said about D'Angelo, how the Prince influence "takes so much space in his world". To me to be "Prince-like" isn't so much about sounding very, very close to to the point of directly miming the "Prince" sound/movements, but like coming close to what he was artistically, that diverse/original composite.

Like in that Top 5 thread, look at how different some of the tastes are. That was maybe where I was coming from with "Prince-like." As you said, add some more flavor, ha.

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Reply #9 posted 07/03/16 4:55am

KoolEaze

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Replica said:

WhisperingDandelions said:

This is understandable. A lot of "neo soul" sounds a little too intentionally throwback for my tastes, usually with the notable exception of material produced by the widely-cited creator of the genre (and the person who produced some of the original demos for D'Angelo's Voodoo album), J Dilla. That guy was taking it to the next level artistically, the other stuff is usually solidly constructed but almost overly nostaglic.


To me, though, I could never see the Prince/D'Angelo comparisons, because like OP said, the songs and vocals kind of meander, while Prince's songs were always super tight and compact even if they went long jam style. Plus, only three records in 20 years? Prince has side-projects with more recorded output... it's no biggie, just not very Prince-like.



I get more of a Prince vibe from Dilla, honestly. Multi-instrumentalist, did everything on his productions, super-prolific with tons of unreleased music (and very little sleep), so passionate about music that he continued making art while he was literally dying in his hospital bed. And most Prince-like of all, it's very original and diverse, from easily accessible to kinda weird/out there...

[Edited 7/3/16 3:57am]

Being a multi instrumentalist doesn't make you Prince-like lol

It makes you a... wait for it... drum roll... multi instrumentalist! There's a bunch of multi instrumentalists, and a few that can pull it off as a one man band. The new artist Jacob Collier can play almost anything, and sings with a freaking huge vocal register, but doesn't sound like Prince at all. The sound Dilla had, is not similar to Prince, compared to how similar D'angelo sounds. D'angelo sounds like a mix between marvin gaye, curtis mayfield, prince, al green and sly stone. But the Prince influence takes so much space in his world, that he even adds old Prince band members to his crew, uses the linn-ish clap on the 8, samples the Parad album, does his piano medleys like Prince did it in the Lovesexy tour... leans on the piano with makeup around his eys while he flirts with the audience, teases them, walks away from the piano... screams like james brown on long funk wamps...

I've seen his live performances twice with my own two eyes, and I've studied his style. I truly love his music. But it's clearly not trying to hide the fact that he is the biggest fanboy ever. I respect that though. I wouldn't hide it too much either. I'd just probably try to add some more falvour to it lol

[Edited 7/3/16 4:12am]

Great post, great observation.

Like you, I have seen D´Angelo twice (during the Voodoo tour and during the Black Messiah tour, and both shows were fantastic).

And I agree with you regarding the Curtis Mayfield and Marvin Gaye comparisons. D´Angelo openly talked about that in his GQ interview.

It is a bit strange to see some of the parallels or Prince influences in his show (those two young background singers with sunglasses and their white shirts reminded me a little bit of Wally Safford and Gregory Brooks), he often employs Prince´s ex-bandmembers or people like the great Jesse Johnson , and even his tourmanager is a former Prince associate (Alan Leeds....and it felt strange to see Jesse Johnson AND Alan Leeds on stage but not in a bad way).

Maybe it´s just me but the beginning of the song Charade reminds me a lot of the beginning of The Line (Cross the Line), just the first couple of seconds, and my friends who were at the concert with me told me that it sounds like a typical Prince song.

.

All in all, I can see some of the influences (and differences of course) but I don´t mind because I love both and let´s remember that Prince was heavily influenced by Sly Stone, James Brown, Santana and maybe Hendrix to some extent, whether it´s the costumes, dance moves , multiethnic band or employing band members of your heroes (Maceo Parker, Larry Graham etc.)

.

I do understand why non-fans criticize D´Angelo but, personally, as far as I´m concerned, I am just glad he´s still around , doing what he´s doing , in his own tempo, and with his own style nevertheless.

Many complain that D´Angelo is not very prolific, which may be true if we look at his output over the last decades but I know from people who have worked with him that he´s got tons of unreleased material, so maybe he´s not that slow and lazy but just doesn´t release that material, for whatever reason.

.

I also happen to like his voice and singing style but I understand why his critics say he´s mumbling or is difficult to understand on his last album. This was not the case on his debut album, on Voodoo or that live album release, and during his live shows his voice and the lyrics are very clear.

Do you know why he chose to bury his vocals so deeply in the mix?

" I´d rather be a stank ass hoe because I´m not stupid. Oh my goodness! I got more drugs! I´m always funny dude...I´m hilarious! Are we gonna smoke?"




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Reply #10 posted 07/03/16 5:13am

Replica

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KoolEaze said:

Replica said:

Being a multi instrumentalist doesn't make you Prince-like lol

It makes you a... wait for it... drum roll... multi instrumentalist! There's a bunch of multi instrumentalists, and a few that can pull it off as a one man band. The new artist Jacob Collier can play almost anything, and sings with a freaking huge vocal register, but doesn't sound like Prince at all. The sound Dilla had, is not similar to Prince, compared to how similar D'angelo sounds. D'angelo sounds like a mix between marvin gaye, curtis mayfield, prince, al green and sly stone. But the Prince influence takes so much space in his world, that he even adds old Prince band members to his crew, uses the linn-ish clap on the 8, samples the Parad album, does his piano medleys like Prince did it in the Lovesexy tour... leans on the piano with makeup around his eys while he flirts with the audience, teases them, walks away from the piano... screams like james brown on long funk wamps...

I've seen his live performances twice with my own two eyes, and I've studied his style. I truly love his music. But it's clearly not trying to hide the fact that he is the biggest fanboy ever. I respect that though. I wouldn't hide it too much either. I'd just probably try to add some more falvour to it lol

[Edited 7/3/16 4:12am]

Great post, great observation.

Like you, I have seen D´Angelo twice (during the Voodoo tour and during the Black Messiah tour, and both shows were fantastic).

And I agree with you regarding the Curtis Mayfield and Marvin Gaye comparisons. D´Angelo openly talked about that in his GQ interview.

It is a bit strange to see some of the parallels or Prince influences in his show (those two young background singers with sunglasses and their white shirts reminded me a little bit of Wally Safford and Gregory Brooks), he often employs Prince´s ex-bandmembers or people like the great Jesse Johnson , and even his tourmanager is a former Prince associate (Alan Leeds....and it felt strange to see Jesse Johnson AND Alan Leeds on stage but not in a bad way).

Maybe it´s just me but the beginning of the song Charade reminds me a lot of the beginning of The Line (Cross the Line), just the first couple of seconds, and my friends who were at the concert with me told me that it sounds like a typical Prince song.

.

All in all, I can see some of the influences (and differences of course) but I don´t mind because I love both and let´s remember that Prince was heavily influenced by Sly Stone, James Brown, Santana and maybe Hendrix to some extent, whether it´s the costumes, dance moves , multiethnic band or employing band members of your heroes (Maceo Parker, Larry Graham etc.)

.

I do understand why non-fans criticize D´Angelo but, personally, as far as I´m concerned, I am just glad he´s still around , doing what he´s doing , in his own tempo, and with his own style nevertheless.

Many complain that D´Angelo is not very prolific, which may be true if we look at his output over the last decades but I know from people who have worked with him that he´s got tons of unreleased material, so maybe he´s not that slow and lazy but just doesn´t release that material, for whatever reason.

.

I also happen to like his voice and singing style but I understand why his critics say he´s mumbling or is difficult to understand on his last album. This was not the case on his debut album, on Voodoo or that live album release, and during his live shows his voice and the lyrics are very clear.

Do you know why he chose to bury his vocals so deeply in the mix?

He experimented a bit with mumbling even back on the Voodoo album, even though we heard everything he said. He didn't pronounce the words as crystal clear as Prince would do. It's a part of the "sloppy" style on his swamp funk. It suits his style, and he has a more "lazy" attitude than Prince. He is way more laid back, and even more shy than Prince. I think he kinda developed the style further, and combined it with modern trends of drowning the vocals. Remember when The Weeknd made his first mixtapes? He drowned his albums in heavy reverb. It gave the music a whole other feel. Blood Orange does similar stuff, and now we have this dude Kossisko, known as 100s when he was a rapper. They're all doing rnb with drowned vocals. Personally I sometimes feel like it's a bit of a forced trend, and other times it works with the music. I personally thinke these artists has managed to use it in a way that fit the music they make. It's another atmosphere. The hipster movement with James Blake etc etc has done this for years now though. Even pop music has drowned vocals now. But D'angelo was actually trying it out a bit, even back on Voodoo. The only difference is that his vocals was more up front than now, and he didn't use alot of reverb. It was more live and authentic kinda.

[Edited 7/3/16 5:13am]

[Edited 7/3/16 5:14am]

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Reply #11 posted 07/03/16 6:20am

KoolEaze

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Replica said:

KoolEaze said:

Great post, great observation.

Like you, I have seen D´Angelo twice (during the Voodoo tour and during the Black Messiah tour, and both shows were fantastic).

And I agree with you regarding the Curtis Mayfield and Marvin Gaye comparisons. D´Angelo openly talked about that in his GQ interview.

It is a bit strange to see some of the parallels or Prince influences in his show (those two young background singers with sunglasses and their white shirts reminded me a little bit of Wally Safford and Gregory Brooks), he often employs Prince´s ex-bandmembers or people like the great Jesse Johnson , and even his tourmanager is a former Prince associate (Alan Leeds....and it felt strange to see Jesse Johnson AND Alan Leeds on stage but not in a bad way).

Maybe it´s just me but the beginning of the song Charade reminds me a lot of the beginning of The Line (Cross the Line), just the first couple of seconds, and my friends who were at the concert with me told me that it sounds like a typical Prince song.

.

All in all, I can see some of the influences (and differences of course) but I don´t mind because I love both and let´s remember that Prince was heavily influenced by Sly Stone, James Brown, Santana and maybe Hendrix to some extent, whether it´s the costumes, dance moves , multiethnic band or employing band members of your heroes (Maceo Parker, Larry Graham etc.)

.

I do understand why non-fans criticize D´Angelo but, personally, as far as I´m concerned, I am just glad he´s still around , doing what he´s doing , in his own tempo, and with his own style nevertheless.

Many complain that D´Angelo is not very prolific, which may be true if we look at his output over the last decades but I know from people who have worked with him that he´s got tons of unreleased material, so maybe he´s not that slow and lazy but just doesn´t release that material, for whatever reason.

.

I also happen to like his voice and singing style but I understand why his critics say he´s mumbling or is difficult to understand on his last album. This was not the case on his debut album, on Voodoo or that live album release, and during his live shows his voice and the lyrics are very clear.

Do you know why he chose to bury his vocals so deeply in the mix?

He experimented a bit with mumbling even back on the Voodoo album, even though we heard everything he said. He didn't pronounce the words as crystal clear as Prince would do. It's a part of the "sloppy" style on his swamp funk. It suits his style, and he has a more "lazy" attitude than Prince. He is way more laid back, and even more shy than Prince. I think he kinda developed the style further, and combined it with modern trends of drowning the vocals. Remember when The Weeknd made his first mixtapes? He drowned his albums in heavy reverb. It gave the music a whole other feel. Blood Orange does similar stuff, and now we have this dude Kossisko, known as 100s when he was a rapper. They're all doing rnb with drowned vocals. Personally I sometimes feel like it's a bit of a forced trend, and other times it works with the music. I personally thinke these artists has managed to use it in a way that fit the music they make. It's another atmosphere. The hipster movement with James Blake etc etc has done this for years now though. Even pop music has drowned vocals now. But D'angelo was actually trying it out a bit, even back on Voodoo. The only difference is that his vocals was more up front than now, and he didn't use alot of reverb. It was more live and authentic kinda.

[Edited 7/3/16 5:13am]

[Edited 7/3/16 5:14am]

Great reply, interesting way to look at it.

Thanks!

" I´d rather be a stank ass hoe because I´m not stupid. Oh my goodness! I got more drugs! I´m always funny dude...I´m hilarious! Are we gonna smoke?"




http://kooleasehvac.com/
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Reply #12 posted 07/03/16 6:31am

Replica

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KoolEaze said:

Replica said:

He experimented a bit with mumbling even back on the Voodoo album, even though we heard everything he said. He didn't pronounce the words as crystal clear as Prince would do. It's a part of the "sloppy" style on his swamp funk. It suits his style, and he has a more "lazy" attitude than Prince. He is way more laid back, and even more shy than Prince. I think he kinda developed the style further, and combined it with modern trends of drowning the vocals. Remember when The Weeknd made his first mixtapes? He drowned his albums in heavy reverb. It gave the music a whole other feel. Blood Orange does similar stuff, and now we have this dude Kossisko, known as 100s when he was a rapper. They're all doing rnb with drowned vocals. Personally I sometimes feel like it's a bit of a forced trend, and other times it works with the music. I personally thinke these artists has managed to use it in a way that fit the music they make. It's another atmosphere. The hipster movement with James Blake etc etc has done this for years now though. Even pop music has drowned vocals now. But D'angelo was actually trying it out a bit, even back on Voodoo. The only difference is that his vocals was more up front than now, and he didn't use alot of reverb. It was more live and authentic kinda.

[Edited 7/3/16 5:13am]

[Edited 7/3/16 5:14am]

Great reply, interesting way to look at it.

Thanks!

NP smile

Just my point of view of course, as I'm a producer and singer too. I study all parts of their music that I have the ability to understand. It's just a perspective, and not the absolute truth. I love em both though. And Prince is of course my all time favourite smile. Nice to share some views though, as all perspectives can add to further understanding of something. We all see and hear stuff differently because of our background, and that's what's so fun about discussion and sharing thoughts, ideas and perspectives. We all learn from all the angles approached.

[Edited 7/3/16 6:32am]

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Reply #13 posted 07/03/16 6:33am

PurpleColossus

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I'm with you MattyJam, I've never understood the appeal either...Maybe some fans like him because he was a Prince fan and covered 'She's Always In My Hair'? confuse

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Reply #14 posted 07/03/16 6:35am

CalhounSq

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I dig him - pretty solid albums, just sketchy as hell on consistency. Always happy to hear stuff from him though.
heart prince I never met you, but I LOVE you & I will forever!! Thank you for being YOU - my little Princey, the best to EVER do it prince heart
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Reply #15 posted 07/03/16 8:09am

GhostChick

NorthC said:

No, you're not. I heared the first single Brown Sugar and thought, that's a Rolling Stones song. And the track wasn't so good that I wanted to hear more. But I never was a big fan of this "nu soul" that was popular in the 90s. I didn't find it very original.

Neo Soul.

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Reply #16 posted 07/03/16 8:12am

GhostChick

WhisperingDandelions said:

NorthC said:

I never was a big fan of this "nu soul" that was popular in the 90s. I didn't find it very original.

This is understandable. A lot of "neo soul" sounds a little too intentionally throwback for my tastes, usually with the notable exception of material produced by the widely-cited creator of the genre (and the person who produced some of the original demos for D'Angelo's Voodoo album), J Dilla. That guy was taking it to the next level artistically, the other stuff is usually solidly constructed but almost overly nostaglic.


To me, though, I could never see the Prince/D'Angelo comparisons, because like OP said, the songs and vocals kind of meander, while Prince's songs were always super tight and compact even if they went long jam style. Plus, only three records in 20 years? Prince has side-projects with more recorded output... it's no biggie, just not very Prince-like.



I get more of a Prince vibe from Dilla, honestly. Multi-instrumentalist, did everything on his productions, super-prolific with tons of unreleased music (and very little sleep), so passionate about music that he continued making art while he was literally dying in his hospital bed. And most Prince-like of all, it's very original and diverse, from easily accessible to kinda weird/out there...

[Edited 7/3/16 3:57am]

When did people start comparing Prince and D'Angelo?

A lot of these "hard-core" Prince fans had never even heard of D'Angelo until that Jimmy Fallon performance.

When D was at his prime, he was NOT compared to Prince. In fact, Prince is not usually a comparison brought up with most neo soul artists of THAT time. I mean they list him definetely as an influence but the music was called "neo soul".

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Reply #17 posted 07/03/16 8:36am

WhisperingDand
elions

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GhostChick said:

WhisperingDandelions said:

This is understandable. A lot of "neo soul" sounds a little too intentionally throwback for my tastes, usually with the notable exception of material produced by the widely-cited creator of the genre (and the person who produced some of the original demos for D'Angelo's Voodoo album), J Dilla. That guy was taking it to the next level artistically, the other stuff is usually solidly constructed but almost overly nostaglic.


To me, though, I could never see the Prince/D'Angelo comparisons, because like OP said, the songs and vocals kind of meander, while Prince's songs were always super tight and compact even if they went long jam style. Plus, only three records in 20 years? Prince has side-projects with more recorded output... it's no biggie, just not very Prince-like.



I get more of a Prince vibe from Dilla, honestly. Multi-instrumentalist, did everything on his productions, super-prolific with tons of unreleased music (and very little sleep), so passionate about music that he continued making art while he was literally dying in his hospital bed. And most Prince-like of all, it's very original and diverse, from easily accessible to kinda weird/out there...

[Edited 7/3/16 3:57am]

When did people start comparing Prince and D'Angelo?

A lot of these "hard-core" Prince fans had never even heard of D'Angelo until that Jimmy Fallon performance.

When D was at his prime, he was NOT compared to Prince. In fact, Prince is not usually a comparison brought up with most neo soul artists of THAT time. I mean they list him definetely as an influence but the music was called "neo soul".

Well, if you mean just in this thread I admit I got off in a weird tangent early morning back there

But the comparisons/references always happened. I mean, I remember "Untitled (How Does It Feel)" getting a lot of nods to Prince at the time at the very least. Which was the last super big single I think, if they did already know of D'Angelo.

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Reply #18 posted 07/03/16 9:12am

vainandy

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He bores me. Not just him, but also Maxwell and Eric Benet which are two others that I've heard people compare to Prince. The only Prince influence I've heard in any of their music is maybe songs like Prince's "Adore" but damn, there so many other styles of Prince music than just "Adore" type songs.

.

My exposure to these three artists has strictly been the songs that Ive heard on the radio or seen on the video channels so unless they have some album tracks that the media isn't playing, the only thing I've heard from any of them is strictly slow to midtempo stuff, not one hard fast uptempo jam, not even ONE. Prince was the exact opposite. On the majority of his albums, the majority of the tracks were all uptempo tracks with maybe two slow jams. I honestly don't know how artists can list Prince as one of their influences if there's not even a hint of funk in their music because Prince had more funk than anything else. And no, funk ain't something slow to midtempo that sounds like something you would sit in an uppity jazz club, sip wine, and bob your head to. Funk is something that makes you want to get out of your seat, get down and dirty, and shake your ass until you're out of breath. I hear none of that fun and energy in any of their songs. If you want to hear actual Prince inspired music, you have to go back to the 1980s and listen to Ebonee Webb or Bobby Nunn. Hell, they sound exactly like Prince from the synthesizers on down to the falsetto, especially Ebonee Webb.

Andy is a four letter word.
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Reply #19 posted 07/03/16 9:16am

roverlo

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vainandy said:

He bores me. Not just him, but also Maxwell and Eric Benet which are two others that I've heard people compare to Prince. The only Prince influence I've heard in any of their music is maybe songs like Prince's "Adore" but damn, there so many other styles of Prince music than just "Adore" type songs.

.

My exposure to these three artists has strictly been the songs that Ive heard on the radio or seen on the video channels so unless they have some album tracks that the media isn't playing, the only thing I've heard from any of them is strictly slow to midtempo stuff, not one hard fast uptempo jam, not even ONE. Prince was the exact opposite. On the majority of his albums, the majority of the tracks were all uptempo tracks with maybe two slow jams. I honestly don't know how artists can list Prince as one of their influences if there's not even a hint of funk in their music because Prince had more funk than anything else. And no, funk ain't something slow to midtempo that sounds like something you would sit in an uppity jazz club, sip wine, and bob your head to. Funk is something that makes you want to get out of your seat, get down and dirty, and shake your ass until you're out of breath. I hear none of that fun and energy in any of their songs. If you want to hear actual Prince inspired music, you have to go back to the 1980s and listen to Ebonee Webb or Bobby Nunn. Hell, they sound exactly like Prince from the synthesizers on down to the falsetto, especially Ebonee Webb.

Very well said. Totally agree.

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Reply #20 posted 07/03/16 9:35am

PurpleDiamonds
1

IMO no one compares to Prince...not even close
I only heard of Dangelo when he did the tribute. sad
Have not watched it again but thought at the time it was good.
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Reply #21 posted 07/03/16 10:04am

Replica

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PurpleDiamonds1 said:

IMO no one compares to Prince...not even close I only heard of Dangelo when he did the tribute. sad Have not watched it again but thought at the time it was good.

Personally I think you're really missing out if you've not given his music a chance. Yeah, he's not as crazy or weird and original as Prince. But his last two albums are still classics imo. Marvin Gaye didn't have 1% of the madness Prince had, but still managed to create a few classics.

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Reply #22 posted 07/03/16 10:05am

thedance

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to be honest I have never listened to Dangelo.

I dislike or even hate radio, usually I'm listening to music from my youth, via LP, CD or digital iTunes playlists, on my PC or iPod.

Usually music from the 60-70-80's and a bit from the 90's...

now don't flame me, I'm only being honest, in general soul music isn't my preferred genre.

I prefer, pop - rock - funk - I'm listening to The Dreaming by Kate Bush right now..

Back from her golden era.. wink

Prince 4Ever. heart
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Reply #23 posted 07/03/16 10:24am

Replica

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thedance said:

to be honest I have never listened to Dangelo.

I dislike or even hate radio, usually I'm listening to music from my youth, via LP, CD or digital iTunes playlists, on my PC or iPod.

Usually music from the 60-70-80's and a bit from the 90's...

now don't flame me, I'm only being honest, in general soul music isn't my preferred genre.

I prefer, pop - rock - funk - I'm listening to The Dreaming by Kate Bush right now..

Back from her golden era.. wink

The radio is not where to find D'angelo. He has never been about pop music. The only comercial thing he ever did was to take off his clothes for the song Untitled, and the cover art for Voodoo. His music doesn't fit the radio at all. It's soul and "swamp funk". His laid back beats sounds like he's been listening alot to Parliament, Bootsy and The Meters etc... but he has made it even sloppier, while still maintaining the feel of groove. Actually it sounds VERY groovy with Pino on bass and questlove handling the drums. Alot of the sloppiness comes from his admiration towards Dilla.

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Reply #24 posted 07/03/16 10:49am

Melted

NorthC said:

No, you're not. I heared the first single Brown Sugar and thought, that's a Rolling Stones song. And the track wasn't so good that I wanted to hear more. But I never was a big fan of this "nu soul" that was popular in the 90s. I didn't find it very original.


It not original. It's the same thang ma mama sang in the choir 50 some years ago. Rehashed...all of it. Some I like some I don't. What I don't like I don't knock though. What I like I love though ain't no in-between. Babae! 😉
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Reply #25 posted 07/03/16 11:46am

NorthC

thedance said:

to be honest I have never listened to Dangelo.

I dislike or even hate radio, usually I'm listening to music from my youth, via LP, CD or digital iTunes playlists, on my PC or iPod.

Usually music from the 60-70-80's and a bit from the 90's...



now don't flame me, I'm only being honest, in general soul music isn't my preferred genre.

I prefer, pop - rock - funk - I'm listening to The Dreaming by Kate Bush right now..

Back from her golden era.. wink


I'm not gonna flame you, I understand where you're coming from. I think we're more or less the same age (I'm 45). The music that you hear in your teens is the music that stays with you the most. In the 90s, I was beginning to feel like an old fart; hip hop and grunge and Britpop didn't do it for me. Nu soul was a little better. I bought Maxwell's first album and saw him in concert. He played This Woman's Work!!!! But by now I've given up trying to be hip. I'm just an old fart. And now I'm going to listen to some Kate Bush too. thumbs up!
[Edited 7/3/16 11:48am]
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Reply #26 posted 07/03/16 12:07pm

funkaholic1972

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He is no Prince, but honestly who is? I agree with Replica that he has made some interesting albums and is a very enjoyable live performer. For me he is one of the very few artists today that still continue in the vain of the oldschool R&B 'chitlin circuit' type of music and performance. That I happen to love, so I am happy to have D around. I rate him highy. My hope is that D might get inspired/awakened by Prince's death and starts working on (and releasing) new music in a higher gear.

[Edited 7/8/16 13:56pm]

RIP Prince: thank U 4 a funky Time!
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Reply #27 posted 07/03/16 5:29pm

ldmendes

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I'm diggin Brown Sugar right now...D'angelo is ok with me..you can hear Prince's influence

..Hello, who is it?
Yes, this is a prettyman, Princey!
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Reply #28 posted 07/03/16 6:17pm

morningsong

I think he's hot but I'm one of the few that just can't get into him. shrug
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Reply #29 posted 07/03/16 6:20pm

Baduizm

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sorry.

[Edited 7/3/16 18:25pm]

I'm in the news again
For paying dues my friend
And not the type of ganda U prop up in my way
Don't Play me
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