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Thread started 06/08/19 9:36am

2freaky4church
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America has a Bill Maher problem.

Too many of us are like Bill Maher: He started out like a Libertarian nut. He turned into a mushy moderate. He then went left and voted for Nader. He went kooky Muslim hating after 9/11. Went a bit less left, now he is a Democratic party asshat.

Compare this to me. I was an Anarchist in the early 90s, am still solidly Anarchist and radical. I did not change I became better.

Too many people are not like me. lol

We go with the wind. Go with facts and reality. Be me. hehe

All you others say Hell Yea!! woot!
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Reply #1 posted 06/08/19 9:39am

OnlyNDaUsa

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and he tells racist jokes...

No one is coming for your abortion: they just want common-sense abortion regulations: background checks, waiting periods, lifetime limits, take a class, and a small tax.
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Reply #2 posted 06/08/19 9:46am

OnlyNDaUsa

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so anyway you do not like him... so don't watch him. I used to watch him a little when he was on basic cable... he was okay... I do not think speaking truth to the radical elements of a group of people is that problematic. We can say the same of bad cops... and the argument that it is just a few bad cops gets shut down by they "if most are good when why don't the good ones rat out the bad?" (Like I did)

you are mad that he did not vote the way you wanted him to vote? That is pretty odd... but but it goes to show how when I have said it is not enough to agree on much of an issue you better agree 100%. or when i said how Conservative woman or minorities get attacked for not keeping their place... somehow I am the bigot? (saying that a black woman who likes trump is being used is TRUTH but when I say the left is using blacks to get votes... I am a bigot for saying they are easily fooled?)

No one is coming for your abortion: they just want common-sense abortion regulations: background checks, waiting periods, lifetime limits, take a class, and a small tax.
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Reply #3 posted 06/08/19 9:47am

2freaky4church
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I said America, not just him.

All you others say Hell Yea!! woot!
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Reply #4 posted 06/08/19 9:58am

OnlyNDaUsa

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2freaky4church1 said:

I said America, not just him.

then his ratings will sink and at some point HBO will pull the plug and you will get your wish that someone you do not like, who you apparently do not watch, and have no real interest in is no longer on TV.


Why do you have such issues with other people hearing content you do not like?

No one is coming for your abortion: they just want common-sense abortion regulations: background checks, waiting periods, lifetime limits, take a class, and a small tax.
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Reply #5 posted 06/08/19 10:03am

jjhunsecker

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I love Maher- don't always agree with everything he says, but he's very funny, and very perceptive

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Reply #6 posted 06/08/19 10:44am

OnlyNDaUsa

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jjhunsecker said:

I love Maher- don't always agree with everything he says, but he's very funny, and very perceptive

which is fine with me! Even when you made excuses for his racist joke. See you need not agree with everything someone says to like them for other things. I am often accused of being cool with negative aspects of some person becasue I agree or support them for OTHER things. It is called balance.

No one is coming for your abortion: they just want common-sense abortion regulations: background checks, waiting periods, lifetime limits, take a class, and a small tax.
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Reply #7 posted 06/08/19 11:23am

jjhunsecker

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When I was younger in the 1970s and 80s, I had a very diverse group of friends, and we often used what would now be considered "politically incorrect" jokes amongst ourselves, often of a racial or ethnic or sexual nature. One knew the difference between a joke made by a close friend, and slurs intended by others to hurt or threaten or demean. It's called CONTEXT .... Also, we grew up hearing comedians like Don Rickles, Richard Pryor, George Carlin, Redd Foxx, etc...It was a different world then, and certain things from that time wouldn't pass muster today.


An recent example : a few weeks ago ABC did a live recreation of an episode of the "Jeffersons" that was originally broadcast about 1975 or so. They used the exact same script. Twice during the episode, the so-called "N-word" was used. In the new ABC version, it was beeped out. When it was originally shown in 1975, they just said the word straight out, no censoring .

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Reply #8 posted 06/08/19 11:40am

OnlyNDaUsa

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jjhunsecker said:

When I was younger in the 1970s and 80s, I had a very diverse group of friends, and we often used what would now be considered "politically incorrect" jokes amongst ourselves, often of a racial or ethnic or sexual nature. One knew the difference between a joke made by a close friend, and slurs intended by others to hurt or threaten or demean. It's called CONTEXT .... Also, we grew up hearing comedians like Don Rickles, Richard Pryor, George Carlin, Redd Foxx, etc...It was a different world then, and certain things from that time wouldn't pass muster today.


An recent example : a few weeks ago ABC did a live recreation of an episode of the "Jeffersons" that was originally broadcast about 1975 or so. They used the exact same script. Twice during the episode, the so-called "N-word" was used. In the new ABC version, it was beeped out. When it was originally shown in 1975, they just said the word straight out, no censoring .

did they really use that word? I am surprised. I did watch the Jefferson's... I do not remember that? On All in the Family i recall he used some sound alike words..

but anyway: do you agree that we should not go back in time and hold people to the standard of today for things said in the past?

EDIT


wow found them on YT... dang.

[Edited 6/8/19 11:44am]

No one is coming for your abortion: they just want common-sense abortion regulations: background checks, waiting periods, lifetime limits, take a class, and a small tax.
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Reply #9 posted 06/08/19 12:24pm

jjhunsecker

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Everything depends on context... I cannot stress that enough.

One of the greatest comedy sketches of all time- the Richard Pryor/Chevy Chase skit from SNL in 1975 "Word Association", would probably not pass muster today

[youtube]www.youtube.com/watch?v=j9TS1pRmajU[/youtube]


However, the being in the "past" does not make George Wallace or Lester Maddox or Bull Connor or Orville Faubus or Richard Nixon, or even John Wayne, any LESS racist...

[Edited 6/8/19 15:47pm]

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Reply #10 posted 06/08/19 1:10pm

guitarslinger4
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jjhunsecker said:

Everything depends on context... I cannot stress that enough.





Can't agree with this enough. And a big part of the problem today is that we're having some of the most important conversations on social media, where the most human elements of communication are completely absent, which means context can be more difficult to figure out.

I blame social media for a large part of the divisiveness in today's society, and the sooner we leave it behind, or at least diminish its effect on communication, the better the quality of our communications will be. I'm not going to hold my breath for this to happen, but I can only hope.

[Edited 6/8/19 13:11pm]
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Reply #11 posted 06/08/19 1:13pm

guitarslinger4
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As for Bill Mahar, I don't always agree with him, but I admire that he's willing to call things what they are even if it means catching hell from carious elements of society. He's a pretty intellectually honest guy from what I've seen and I wish more media figures had that quality these days.
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Reply #12 posted 06/08/19 2:44pm

2elijah

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jjhunsecker said:

When I was younger in the 1970s and 80s, I had a very diverse group of friends, and we often used what would now be considered "politically incorrect" jokes amongst ourselves, often of a racial or ethnic or sexual nature. One knew the difference between a joke made by a close friend, and slurs intended by others to hurt or threaten or demean. It's called CONTEXT .... Also, we grew up hearing comedians like Don Rickles, Richard Pryor, George Carlin, Redd Foxx, etc...It was a different world then, and certain things from that time wouldn't pass muster today.




An recent example : a few weeks ago ABC did a live recreation of an episode of the "Jeffersons" that was originally broadcast about 1975 or so. They used the exact same script. Twice during the episode, the so-called "N-word" was used. In the new ABC version, it was beeped out. When it was originally shown in 1975, they just said the word straight out, no censoring .


Exactly.
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Reply #13 posted 06/08/19 2:47pm

OnlyNDaUsa

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2elijah said:

jjhunsecker said:

When I was younger in the 1970s and 80s, I had a very diverse group of friends, and we often used what would now be considered "politically incorrect" jokes amongst ourselves, often of a racial or ethnic or sexual nature. One knew the difference between a joke made by a close friend, and slurs intended by others to hurt or threaten or demean. It's called CONTEXT .... Also, we grew up hearing comedians like Don Rickles, Richard Pryor, George Carlin, Redd Foxx, etc...It was a different world then, and certain things from that time wouldn't pass muster today.


An recent example : a few weeks ago ABC did a live recreation of an episode of the "Jeffersons" that was originally broadcast about 1975 or so. They used the exact same script. Twice during the episode, the so-called "N-word" was used. In the new ABC version, it was beeped out. When it was originally shown in 1975, they just said the word straight out, no censoring .

Exactly.

except trumps private joke on the Bus was not given the same consideration...

No one is coming for your abortion: they just want common-sense abortion regulations: background checks, waiting periods, lifetime limits, take a class, and a small tax.
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Reply #14 posted 06/08/19 2:53pm

2elijah

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jjhunsecker said:

Everything depends on context... I cannot stress that enough.



One of the greatest comedy sketches of all time- the Richard Pryor/Chevy Chase skit from SNL in 1975 "Word Association", would probably not pass muster today


[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/w...9TS1pRmajU[/youtube]





However, the being in the "past" does not make George Wallace or Lester Maddox or Bull Connor or Orville Faubus or Richard Nixon, or even John Wayne, any LESS racist...



Yep, ‘context’ is the key term.

Also agree w/bolded part. The racist things they said were intentional, no jokes, and no excuses for their racial ignorance. When you have a known history of making, ignorant racist comments, about specific groups of people, those are not jokes.
[Edited 6/8/19 14:54pm]
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Reply #15 posted 06/08/19 3:42pm

jjhunsecker

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guitarslinger44 said:

jjhunsecker said:

Everything depends on context... I cannot stress that enough.

Can't agree with this enough. And a big part of the problem today is that we're having some of the most important conversations on social media, where the most human elements of communication are completely absent, which means context can be more difficult to figure out. I blame social media for a large part of the divisiveness in today's society, and the sooner we leave it behind, or at least diminish its effect on communication, the better the quality of our communications will be. I'm not going to hold my breath for this to happen, but I can only hope. [Edited 6/8/19 13:11pm]

Very true. I remember making some very politically incorrect jokes with a friend of mine years ago , and he said "What we're saying would seem very different if it was just printed on a page, and nobody could see or hear us laughing about it"

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Reply #16 posted 06/08/19 3:45pm

jjhunsecker

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guitarslinger44 said:

As for Bill Mahar, I don't always agree with him, but I admire that he's willing to call things what they are even if it means catching hell from carious elements of society. He's a pretty intellectually honest guy from what I've seen and I wish more media figures had that quality these days.

Maher is his own man, and constantly criticizes his own political allies for their failures and weaknesses. He is as far from "partisan" as you can get , where you just blindly support someone uncritically because you're on the same team

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Reply #17 posted 06/08/19 3:54pm

jjhunsecker

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2elijah said:

jjhunsecker said:

Everything depends on context... I cannot stress that enough.

One of the greatest comedy sketches of all time- the Richard Pryor/Chevy Chase skit from SNL in 1975 "Word Association", would probably not pass muster today

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/w...9TS1pRmajU[/youtube]


However, the being in the "past" does not make George Wallace or Lester Maddox or Bull Connor or Orville Faubus or Richard Nixon, or even John Wayne, any LESS racist...

Yep, ‘context’ is the key term. Also agree w/bolded part. The racist things they said were intentional, no jokes, and no excuses for their racial ignorance. When you have a known history of making, ignorant racist comments, about specific groups of people, those are not jokes. [Edited 6/8/19 14:54pm]

So true...you have people who constantly bring up Bill Maher's stupid joke, but when asked about Steve King- a prominant Conservative Republican congressmen with decades of inflammatory and flat out racist statements0 they say "Who ? I never heard of him . Don't know anything about that, or anything he might have said"...very convenient...And King WAS NOT "joking"

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Reply #18 posted 06/08/19 4:07pm

OnlyNDaUsa

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jjhunsecker said:

2elijah said:

jjhunsecker said: Yep, ‘context’ is the key term. Also agree w/bolded part. The racist things they said were intentional, no jokes, and no excuses for their racial ignorance. When you have a known history of making, ignorant racist comments, about specific groups of people, those are not jokes. [Edited 6/8/19 14:54pm]

So true...you have people who constantly bring up Bill Maher's stupid joke, but when asked about Steve King- a prominant Conservative Republican congressmen with decades of inflammatory and flat out racist statements0 they say "Who ? I never heard of him . Don't know anything about that, or anything he might have said"...very convenient...And King WAS NOT "joking"

I am not sure I claimed to have never heard of him... I do remember that... I do not know of anything he has said PERIOD... if he said or did something racist I will be happy to say he should not have...

and speaking of "not joking" are (maybe you predicted this) joe biden's racist quip about how you can't got to "Dunkin' Donuts unless you have a slight Indian accent." And he is the DNC's front runner...but their last nom was even worst.

No one is coming for your abortion: they just want common-sense abortion regulations: background checks, waiting periods, lifetime limits, take a class, and a small tax.
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Reply #19 posted 06/08/19 4:16pm

jjhunsecker

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EVERY single Dunkin Donuts that I have been in in New York, New Jersey, and Massachusetts (and I've been in a LOT of them) have been almost completely staffed and managed by people of Indian and Pakistani descent. Is it "racist " to mention something that is factually accurate?
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Reply #20 posted 06/08/19 4:22pm

OnlyNDaUsa

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jjhunsecker said:

EVERY single Dunkin Donuts that I have been in in New York, New Jersey, and Massachusetts (and I've been in a LOT of them) have been almost completely staffed and managed by people of Indian and Pakistani descent. Is it "racist " to mention something that is factually accurate?

yes

No one is coming for your abortion: they just want common-sense abortion regulations: background checks, waiting periods, lifetime limits, take a class, and a small tax.
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Reply #21 posted 06/08/19 4:31pm

jjhunsecker

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So now the TRUTH is "racist " ??

But considering that this comes from a Trump apologist, I can't barely take any of it seriously
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Reply #22 posted 06/08/19 5:36pm

IanRG

2freaky4church1 said:

Too many of us are like Bill Maher: He started out like a Libertarian nut. He turned into a mushy moderate. He then went left and voted for Nader. He went kooky Muslim hating after 9/11. Went a bit less left, now he is a Democratic party asshat.

Compare this to me. I was an Anarchist in the early 90s, am still solidly Anarchist and radical. I did not change I became better.

Too many people are not like me. lol

We go with the wind. Go with facts and reality. Be me. hehe

.

Or another way of looking at it is:

.

Too many people either pursue ideological purity or political allegiance long beyond when it is sustainable. This means that if it is necessary to put down all the other sides or to forgive your own side, then to be true to your cause people sell out their morals and what is right. This is less likely if your political beliefs evolve with the circumstances and the times.

.

There is a difference between facts and realities and political choices and preferences. Go with what you believe is right, not with what helps your side or hinders the other sides. Criticise your side when it is wrong and recognise when the other sides may have a better idea. Above all, listen to all sides - not to give each equal weight because no ideas have an equal and opposite point of view, but to determine the better view regardless of ideology or allegiance. Don't see change as going with the wind but as a way of getting better.

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Reply #23 posted 06/08/19 5:47pm

OnlyNDaUsa

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jjhunsecker said:

So now the TRUTH is "racist " ?? But considering that this comes from a Trump apologist, I can't barely take any of it seriously

it can be... and i am not a Trump apologist... I call him when he needs it... odd how you made an excuse for Maher....

but yes the trurh can be racist...

No one is coming for your abortion: they just want common-sense abortion regulations: background checks, waiting periods, lifetime limits, take a class, and a small tax.
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Reply #24 posted 06/08/19 9:10pm

jjhunsecker

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How is it "racist" mentioning that most Dunkin Donuts are run by Indians ? That's just a fact.

Again, I can't take a person who labels Biden and Clinton "racist " yet never used that term about Trump, and has denied or diminished his long and documented history of racial discrimination and animus, just cannot be taken seriously.

And I'll never pretend to be offended by something that I'm not
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Reply #25 posted 06/09/19 4:19am

KoolEaze

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jjhunsecker said:

EVERY single Dunkin Donuts that I have been in in New York, New Jersey, and Massachusetts (and I've been in a LOT of them) have been almost completely staffed and managed by people of Indian and Pakistani descent. Is it "racist " to mention something that is factually accurate?

What is the reason behind it? I know that many police officers on the eastcoast are of Irish descent, and many cab drivers are Indians, many gas stations in New Jersey are operated by Turkish people (or so I´ve heard) but is there a particular reason behind it? I know from my experience in other countries that it´s often to do with relatives who´ve made it to that country and have managed to start a business there and then they just find a job in the same business for their relatives who come later but that´s just my observation from elsewhere. So, is there a particular reason why certain ethnic groups have certain jobs in the USA ?

" I´d rather be a stank ass hoe because I´m not stupid. Oh my goodness! I got more drugs! I´m always funny dude...I´m hilarious! Are we gonna smoke?"




http://kooleasehvac.com/
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Reply #26 posted 06/09/19 4:23am

KoolEaze

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I can´t stand that guy. I used to watch him every now and then and sometimes I still do but I find him very arrogant, borderline racist, unapologetically pro-Israel even when Israel is wrong, and he´s a hypocrite, too.

I do admit that the´s a smart and sometimes funny guy though, and maybe I´d like him if I could meet him in person and just get some things off of my chest that I hate about him but I highly doubt it. I just can´t stand him these days, even when I agree with him on certain issues.

It´s the few bad things about him that I dislike so strongly that I just can´t stand that guy in general.

" I´d rather be a stank ass hoe because I´m not stupid. Oh my goodness! I got more drugs! I´m always funny dude...I´m hilarious! Are we gonna smoke?"




http://kooleasehvac.com/
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Reply #27 posted 06/09/19 12:33pm

jjhunsecker

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KoolEaze said:



jjhunsecker said:


EVERY single Dunkin Donuts that I have been in in New York, New Jersey, and Massachusetts (and I've been in a LOT of them) have been almost completely staffed and managed by people of Indian and Pakistani descent. Is it "racist " to mention something that is factually accurate?

What is the reason behind it? I know that many police officers on the eastcoast are of Irish descent, and many cab drivers are Indians, many gas stations in New Jersey are operated by Turkish people (or so I´ve heard) but is there a particular reason behind it? I know from my experience in other countries that it´s often to do with relatives who´ve made it to that country and have managed to start a business there and then they just find a job in the same business for their relatives who come later but that´s just my observation from elsewhere. So, is there a particular reason why certain ethnic groups have certain jobs in the USA ?



Probably something like that. Someone opens a branch of a franchise, probably hires some relatives or close friends, who then learn the business and eventually open their own franchise. I've been in likely 75-100 different Dunkin Donuts locations in at least 3 States, and every single one was almost completely staffed and managed by Indians. And I have no problem with that- and certainly don't see anything "racist " by mentioning that fact.

(Another business Indians and Pakistanis completely dominate in New York is pornography, oddly enough. Don't know how this happened, because that field used to be run by Italian mobsters. Go into any adult store in NYC, and the entire work staff are Indian men... odd)
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Reply #28 posted 06/09/19 2:15pm

Ugot2shakesumt
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He’s funny. He's a curmudgeon that's not well liked by too many people across the board to be ”a problem”

What does he identify as anyway? Jerk?

He's ok.

And I Dont think anyone else should follow 2freaky, one is enough. I think this highlights how diverse the non-right is. From Way-The-Fuck-Out-There like 2freaky, to whatever the fuck Maher is.

One group that creeps me the fuck out are those that self identify as ”progressives” whatever the fuck that is.
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Reply #29 posted 06/09/19 3:06pm

KoolEaze

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Ugot2shakesumthin said:

He’s funny. He's a curmudgeon that's not well liked by too many people across the board to be ”a problem” What does he identify as anyway? Jerk? He's ok. And I Dont think anyone else should follow 2freaky, one is enough. I think this highlights how diverse the non-right is. From Way-The-Fuck-Out-There like 2freaky, to whatever the fuck Maher is. One group that creeps me the fuck out are those that self identify as ”progressives” whatever the fuck that is.

Why ?

" I´d rather be a stank ass hoe because I´m not stupid. Oh my goodness! I got more drugs! I´m always funny dude...I´m hilarious! Are we gonna smoke?"




http://kooleasehvac.com/
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