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Reply #390 posted 04/29/19 9:48am

2elijah

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poppys said:



deebee said:




2elijah said:


Hey Graycap: Here is an interesting article on reparations written less than a month ago: L https://www.google.com/am...s.amp.html [Edited 4/29/19 4:47am]


There was a stir here, early last year, when the UK Treasury casually tweeted that the money Britain borrowed to compensate slaveowners for loss of 'their property' in 1833, at the time of the Slavery Abolition Act, was only finally paid back in 2015! Mind-bogglingly, they thought we'd be pleased to know that our taxes had been going to this, even a few years previously! I'd be fascinated to learn who exactly was still getting that money.

More on the story here: https://www.theguardian.c...ave-owners




Wow just wow.

...The only people who saw the payment of compensation as a positive were the people who had spent three decades campaigning for it and would be the beneficiaries of it – the slave owners.

And the slave owners not only received compensation from the British taxpayer, they won another concession, the euphemistically titled “apprenticeship” system. What this meant was that the slaves themselves were forced to work the fields for a further six years after the supposed abolition of slavery – 45 hours a week for no pay.

Lexington Wright tweeted: “So basically, my father and his children and grandchildren have been paying taxes to compensate those who enslaved our ancestors, and you want me to be proud of that fact. Are you f**king insane???”




Yes, mind boggling. The slaveowners didn’t deserve compensation. The people they enslaved should have received compensation for the free labor, they were forced to do, including children as young as 5-years old, who were also forced to work in the fields with their parents.

The headline of that tweet sort of misleads the readers because, the British taxpayers' money did not pay to end the slave trade. Their taxes was used to pay off the loan that was paid to the former slaveowners, because the former slaveowners claimed the slaves as 'loss of property' when slavery was abolished. The former slaves nor their descendants did not receive any of that money.
[Edited 4/29/19 23:36pm]
Happy New Year!
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Reply #391 posted 04/29/19 10:38pm

Graycap23

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2elijah said:

poppys said:


Wow just wow.

...The only people who saw the payment of compensation as a positive were the people who had spent three decades campaigning for it and would be the beneficiaries of it – the slave owners.

And the slave owners not only received compensation from the British taxpayer, they won another concession, the euphemistically titled “apprenticeship” system. What this meant was that the slaves themselves were forced to work the fields for a further six years after the supposed abolition of slavery – 45 hours a week for no pay.

Lexington Wright tweeted: “So basically, my father and his children and grandchildren have been paying taxes to compensate those who enslaved our ancestors, and you want me to be proud of that fact. Are you f**king insane???”

Yes, mind boggling. The slaveowners didn’t deserve compensation. The people they enslaved should have received compensation for the free labor, they were forced to do, including children as young as 5-years old, who were also forced to work in the fields with their parents.

Typically fuckery..........that folks dismiss on a regular basis.

FOOLS multiply when WISE Men & Women are silent.
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Reply #392 posted 04/30/19 10:06am

2freaky4church
1

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When ya movin Gray?

All you others say Hell Yea!! woot!
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Reply #393 posted 05/01/19 7:20am

maplenpg

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Graycap23 said:

2elijah said:

poppys said: Yes, mind boggling. The slaveowners didn’t deserve compensation. The people they enslaved should have received compensation for the free labor, they were forced to do, including children as young as 5-years old, who were also forced to work in the fields with their parents.

Typically fuckery..........that folks dismiss on a regular basis.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/new...n-48097051


Here in the UK Cambridge University have commisioned a two years study to see how it might have gained financially from the slave trade. Some quotes from the article:

""It is only right that Cambridge should look into its own exposure to the profits of coerced labour," said vice-chancellor Stephen Toope."


""We cannot know at this stage what exactly it will find but it is reasonable to assume that, like many large British institutions during the colonial era, the university will have benefited directly or indirectly," said Prof Millett."

"It will also consider how the university might make reparation for any links to the legacy of the slave trade - whether in symbolic terms, such as monuments or re-naming buildings, or in funding bursaries or foundations.

Prof Millett highlighted that the University of Glasgow is setting up a centre for the study of slavery, after it found that it had received donations in the 18th and 19th Century, derived from slave trade profits, which could be worth up to £198m in present day value."



It'll be very interesting to see the 'reparation' in practise, IMO it has to take the form of bursaries and scholarships as many descendants of slaves will still be unable to consider university an option. I personally couldn't give a toss about a re-named building or a statue which won't help social mobility one bit.


[Edited 5/1/19 7:21am]

We are all okay, as long as "we" are the ones living on top of the empire of eternal war. - Jaawwnn
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Reply #394 posted 05/01/19 1:53pm

Graycap23

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FOOLS multiply when WISE Men & Women are silent.
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Reply #395 posted 05/01/19 2:01pm

2elijah

avatar

maplenpg said:



Graycap23 said:




2elijah said:


poppys said: Yes, mind boggling. The slaveowners didn’t deserve compensation. The people they enslaved should have received compensation for the free labor, they were forced to do, including children as young as 5-years old, who were also forced to work in the fields with their parents.

Typically fuckery.....that folks dismiss on a regular basis.




https://www.bbc.co.uk/new...n-48097051


Here in the UK Cambridge University have commisioned a two years study to see how it might have gained financially from the slave trade. Some quotes from the article:

""It is only right that Cambridge should look into its own exposure to the profits of coerced labour," said vice-chancellor Stephen Toope."


""We cannot know at this stage what exactly it will find but it is reasonable to assume that, like many large British institutions during the colonial era, the university will have benefited directly or indirectly," said Prof Millett."


"It will also consider how the university might make reparation for any links to the legacy of the slave trade - whether in symbolic terms, such as monuments or re-naming buildings, or in funding bursaries or foundations.


Prof Millett highlighted that the University of Glasgow is setting up a centre for the study of slavery, after it found that it had received donations in the 18th and 19th Century, derived from slave trade profits, which could be worth up to £198m in present day value."




It'll be very interesting to see the 'reparation' in practise, IMO it has to take the form of bursaries and scholarships as many descendants of slaves will still be unable to consider university an option. I personally couldn't give a toss about a re-named building or a statue which won't help social mobility one bit.


[Edited 5/1/19 7:21am]


Thanks for that info. It will be interesting to see the outcome of that study.
Happy New Year!
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Reply #396 posted 05/03/19 3:02pm

uPtoWnNY

Graycap23 said:

....and when they riot, the media (especially the mouth-breathers at FAUX-News) will never call them 'savages'.

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Reply #397 posted 05/05/19 1:34am

Pokeno4Money

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jjhunsecker said:

Pokeno4Money said:


You've trashed religion and specifically Christianity a lot in the past, I'm giving you the benefit of the doubt that you weren't being hypocritical.

Wrong. What I trashed was hypocrisy, and people who use religion as a means to attack others. I have nothing but respect for those who have honest religious convictions, especially those who TRULY follow the teachings of Jesus Christ. For what it's worth, I not only attended a religious school as a child, but sent my own child to one, and I have close relatives who are clergy. Your confusing my attacks on "religious" frauds like Franklin Graham, Ralph Reed, Jerry Falwell , etc, along with my disgust on how both the Catholic Church and Orthodox Judaism handled the scandals of pedophiles in their midst with an attack on every aspect of religion... an easy mistake for the simple minded who lack the capacity to understand nuances and complexities . And I have an issue with people wanting their own religious beliefs (on such matters as abortion and gay marriage) codified into laws that would affect others who have different views. [Edited 4/28/19 1:42am]


Just like the worst critics of smoking are former smokers, the biggest haters of religion are those who have religious ties and backgrounds.

The sex scandals were not a reflection of the religion, they were a reflection of some of the leaders of the religion.

Just like terrorism isn't a reflection of Islam, it's a reflection of some of it's followers.

I never said you don't show respect to some who have religious convictions. What I said was the last place you'd be found is in church, am I right or not?

There's only 6 states in the US that don't allow Open Carry: Cali, FL, IL, NY, SC, DC. While SC's gun murder rate is DOUBLE that of Texas, DC's is 6 TIMES that of Texas! https://en.m.wikipedia.or...s_by_state
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Reply #398 posted 05/05/19 4:47am

2elijah

avatar

deebee said:



2elijah said:


Hey Graycap: Here is an interesting article on reparations written less than a month ago: L https://www.google.com/am...s.amp.html [Edited 4/29/19 4:47am]


There was a stir here, early last year, when the UK Treasury casually tweeted that the money Britain borrowed to compensate slaveowners for loss of 'their property' in 1833, at the time of the Slavery Abolition Act, was only finally paid back in 2015! Mind-bogglingly, they thought we'd be pleased to know that our taxes had been going to this, even a few years previously! I'd be fascinated to learn who exactly was still getting that money.

More on the story here: https://www.theguardian.c...ave-owners





Did you see this one?

The issue of reparations seems to be a global topic of discussion this year. Fits right in with the thread topic, because it gives a historic view and explanation of how and why years of racial discrimination/racist laws and mistreatment towards specific groups of people, can affect their lives and survival, within society. Including the economic and educational disparities and racial division it creates within a population, and the long-term effects as time passes. Good to see that it’s a topic being raised around the world, although these types of discussions are of a sensitive nature, it is not for the thin-skinned.

No one should be in fear or intimidated by discussing this topic, on the basis of someone else’s insecurities of the subject nor are they forced to participate.

https://www.google.com/ur...2711169392

European parliament passes watershed resolution calling for reparations for crimes against Africa during European colonialism

By Connor Boyd For Mailonline
20:20 28 Mar 2019, updated 20:28 28 Mar 2019


The European parliament has overwhelmingly backed a watershed resolution calling for reparations for crimes committed in Africa during European colonialism.

The bill urges European member states to introduce a series of sweeping reforms aimed at tackling 'structural racism' facing millions of Afro-Europeans.

It calls on the countries to implement nation-wide strategies to deal with discrimination in education, health, housing, policing, the justice system and politics.

The resolution - approved by 535 MEPs, with 80 votes against and 44 abstentions - also calls on European member states to declassify their colonial archives, covering the most disturbing periods of Europe's colonial past, and issue public apologies.


It urges the EU to adopt 'a workforce diversity and inclusion strategy' to address the underrepresentation of ethnic minority officials.

As it stands, the EU does not share data on race, ethnicity or religion because it's considered contrary to equality, The Guardian reports.


The text is not legally-binding, but it was hailed as a watershed moment campaign groups for specifically focusing on the discrimination faced on the continent by an estimated 15 million people.


'Histories of injustices against Africans and people of African Descent – including enslavement, forced labour, racial apartheid, massacre, and genocides in the context of European colonialism and the transatlantic slave trade – remain largely unrecognised and unaccounted for at an institutional level in EU member states,' the text states.’

The resolution was drawn up by British Labour MEP Claude Moraes and was inspired by the racist behavior experienced by Italian socialist MEP Cecile Kyenge, who served as Italy’s first black government minister.

Pressure is now on the European commission to fund the schemes in the EU's next seven-year budget.

Amel Yacef, the chair of the European Network Against Racism, told The Guardian the vote was 'a historic, watershed moment for the recognition of people of African descent in Europe'.“

She added: 'The European parliament is leading the way and sending a signal to EU member states to tackle structural racism that prevents black people from being included in European society. The ball is now in their court: we need concrete action plans and specific measures now.”
[Edited 5/7/19 4:11am]
Happy New Year!
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Reply #399 posted 05/31/19 2:48pm

uPtoWnNY

Brutally honest talk about segregation in NYC schools.

https://getpocket.com/explore/item/are-private-schools-immoral?utm_source=pocket-newtab

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Reply #400 posted 05/31/19 5:12pm

jjhunsecker

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Pokeno4Money said:



jjhunsecker said:


Pokeno4Money said:



You've trashed religion and specifically Christianity a lot in the past, I'm giving you the benefit of the doubt that you weren't being hypocritical.



Wrong. What I trashed was hypocrisy, and people who use religion as a means to attack others. I have nothing but respect for those who have honest religious convictions, especially those who TRULY follow the teachings of Jesus Christ. For what it's worth, I not only attended a religious school as a child, but sent my own child to one, and I have close relatives who are clergy. Your confusing my attacks on "religious" frauds like Franklin Graham, Ralph Reed, Jerry Falwell , etc, along with my disgust on how both the Catholic Church and Orthodox Judaism handled the scandals of pedophiles in their midst with an attack on every aspect of religion... an easy mistake for the simple minded who lack the capacity to understand nuances and complexities . And I have an issue with people wanting their own religious beliefs (on such matters as abortion and gay marriage) codified into laws that would affect others who have different views. [Edited 4/28/19 1:42am]


Just like the worst critics of smoking are former smokers, the biggest haters of religion are those who have religious ties and backgrounds.

The sex scandals were not a reflection of the religion, they were a reflection of some of the leaders of the religion.

Just like terrorism isn't a reflection of Islam, it's a reflection of some of it's followers.

I never said you don't show respect to some who have religious convictions. What I said was the last place you'd be found is in church, am I right or not?



Again, please don't speak or assume about something you know nothing about. Not that it matters, but I do attend church occasionally, and used to regularly in the past. You're making assumptions based on a misreading (perhaps deliberately) of things I've said.... at least you're consistent, being wrong pretty much all the time.

The sex scandals ARE a reflection of how they used religion as a racket, and covered up the crimes of those involved. The same way that some Islamic clerics DID preach violence and fatwas. You have to look at the whole picture- good and bad. And not be blinded because "religion" is involved.
[Edited 5/31/19 17:16pm]
[Edited 5/31/19 23:27pm]
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Reply #401 posted 05/31/19 5:49pm

OnlyNDaUsa

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jjhunsecker said:

Pokeno4Money said:


Just like the worst critics of smoking are former smokers, the biggest haters of religion are those who have religious ties and backgrounds.

The sex scandals were not a reflection of the religion, they were a reflection of some of the leaders of the religion.

Just like terrorism isn't a reflection of Islam, it's a reflection of some of it's followers.

I never said you don't show respect to some who have religious convictions. What I said was the last place you'd be found is in church, am I right or not?

Again, please don't speak or assume about something you know nothing about. Not that it matters, but I do attend church occasionally, and used to regularly in the past. You're making assumptions based on a misreading (perhaps deliberately) of things I've said.... at least you're consistent, being wrong pretty much all the time. [Edited 5/31/19 17:16pm]

wow you make up falsehoods about me all the time

No one is coming for your abortion: they just want common-sense abortion regulations: background checks, waiting periods, lifetime limits, take a class, and a small tax.
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Reply #402 posted 06/01/19 3:39am

Pokeno4Money

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jjhunsecker said:

Again, please don't speak or assume about something you know nothing about. Not that it matters, but I do attend church occasionally, and used to regularly in the past. You're making assumptions based on a misreading (perhaps deliberately) of things I've said.... at least you're consistent, being wrong pretty much all the time. The sex scandals ARE a reflection of how they used religion as a racket, and covered up the crimes of those involved. The same way that some Islamic clerics DID preach violence and fatwas. You have to look at the whole picture- good and bad. And not be blinded because "religion" is involved. [Edited 5/31/19 17:16pm] [Edited 5/31/19 23:27pm]


I've seen what you've written in the past, it should still be there unless it was edited or removed. Regardless, no point in debating as anyone can say anything about themself without the possibility of being proven right or wrong.

If you want to place labels on large groups of people based strictly on the actions of a few, that's your prerogative. I refuse to do the same, I won't throw out the baby with the bath water. Religion is a good thing for billions of people, I'm not going to condemn it because of the few involved in sex scandals or terrorism.

There's only 6 states in the US that don't allow Open Carry: Cali, FL, IL, NY, SC, DC. While SC's gun murder rate is DOUBLE that of Texas, DC's is 6 TIMES that of Texas! https://en.m.wikipedia.or...s_by_state
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Reply #403 posted 06/01/19 11:03am

jjhunsecker

avatar

Pokeno4Money said:



jjhunsecker said:


Again, please don't speak or assume about something you know nothing about. Not that it matters, but I do attend church occasionally, and used to regularly in the past. You're making assumptions based on a misreading (perhaps deliberately) of things I've said.... at least you're consistent, being wrong pretty much all the time. The sex scandals ARE a reflection of how they used religion as a racket, and covered up the crimes of those involved. The same way that some Islamic clerics DID preach violence and fatwas. You have to look at the whole picture- good and bad. And not be blinded because "religion" is involved. [Edited 5/31/19 17:16pm] [Edited 5/31/19 23:27pm]


I've seen what you've written in the past, it should still be there unless it was edited or removed. Regardless, no point in debating as anyone can say anything about themself without the possibility of being proven right or wrong.

If you want to place labels on large groups of people based strictly on the actions of a few, that's your prerogative. I refuse to do the same, I won't throw out the baby with the bath water. Religion is a good thing for billions of people, I'm not going to condemn it because of the few involved in sex scandals or terrorism.



I'm never going to stop calling out "religious " frauds, hypocrites, and those who use their powers and positions of clergy to commit and cover up their crimes and transgressions.

What I believe and do personally is ultimately irrelevant (though you were stupid and wrong with your assumptions, it doesn't really matter)... But you cannot find one post where I ever attacked religion in a blanket fashion. But political phonies like Graham or Reed, child molesting priests and rabbis, or clerics who preach violence and fatwas against "infidels"- to me, they are all beneath contempt
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Reply #404 posted 06/01/19 11:11am

poppys

uPtoWnNY said:

Brutally honest talk about segregation in NYC schools.

https://getpocket.com/explore/item/are-private-schools-immoral?utm_source=pocket-newtab


Good read. Thanks for posting.

An instant microcosm of this happened here after Katrina. So many already underfunded flooded public shools were scratched in favor of charter schools. Turns out, charters have a lot more choice in which neighborhoods to place the schools making access harder for those without cars or available bus service. Attendance was a limited lottery system that excluded many. Lots of loopholes.

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Reply #405 posted 06/01/19 11:47am

OnlyNDaUsa

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I can not help but wonder if this were to happen would you live under the same privileged system you all enjoy (even if you can not see it) now or would you subject yourself to the shared misery of some other system or take a risk?

No one is coming for your abortion: they just want common-sense abortion regulations: background checks, waiting periods, lifetime limits, take a class, and a small tax.
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Reply #406 posted 06/01/19 12:32pm

jjhunsecker

avatar

poppys said:



uPtoWnNY said:


Brutally honest talk about segregation in NYC schools.



https://getpocket.com/explore/item/are-private-schools-immoral?utm_source=pocket-newtab




Good read. Thanks for posting.

An instant microcosm of this happened here after Katrina. So many already underfunded flooded public shools were scratched in favor of charter schools. Turns out, charters have a lot more choice in which neighborhoods to place the schools making access harder for those without cars or available bus service. Attendance was a limited lottery system that excluded many. Lots of loopholes.



Yes NYC schools have always been wildly segregated. When I was young, my mother wisely opted out of such a discriminatory system by sending me first to a private religious school, and then making sure that my public High School had a majority White student body (in the belief that such a school would have better facilities and teachers and curriculum)
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