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Thread started 03/06/15 10:28am

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Irish Heritage Month [March 2015]

For a change of pace, let's look at the history & culture of the Irish-American

In all it's manifestations. There is more to it that St Patricks Day(was he even Irish) and getting drunk...
I believe if more indepth information about various ethnic groups in America is openly known and more of it in schools that maybe people can see how much we have in common

And have different examples of everyones contributions to this country

http://irishamericanheritagemonth.com/

About Irish American Heritage Month

Since 1991, Presidents of both political parties has designated March as Irish American Heritage Month to recognize the contribution that Irish immigrants and their descendants have played in the formation of our Nation. Among those contributions are nine signers of the Declaration of Independence, over twenty of Washington’s generals, the first man to hold a commission in the United States Navy, over 190,000 Irish born Americans who fought in the Civil War, pioneering women such as Nellie Bly and Christa McAuliffe, the inventor of the modern submarine and 253 Medal of Honor recipients who list the place of their birth as Ireland.

Despite this, the public is largely unaware of “Irish-American Heritage Month”. Should not the contributions of Irish American have the same national and institutional recognition as other ethnic cultural celebrations, such as; National African American History/Black History Month, National Hispanic Heritage Month, Asia/Pacific American Heritage Month? Yet while taxpayer financed institutions such as the Smithsonian, the Library of Congress and even the armed services actively celebrate and recognize the contribution of the groups mentioned above through special programs and materials, they continue to ignore the contributions of Irish Americans.



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Reply #1 posted 03/06/15 10:35am

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Photo by: Frank Franklin II
A reveler holds an Irish flag while attending the St. Patrick's Day Parade Tuesday, March 17, 2009 in New York. St. Patrick's Day revelers took a break from worries about the global economy to enjoy a day of shamrock-themed frivolity, dyeing city fountains green, taking icy ocean plunges and crowding sidewalks along parade routes to see and be seen. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

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Reply #2 posted 03/06/15 10:44am

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2015 Presidential PROCLAMATION of Irish American Heritage Month

Presidential Proclamation — Irish-American Heritage Month, 2015

IRISH-AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH, 2015

– – – – – – –

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

A PROCLAMATION

The vibrant culture and rich heritage of the Irish people shaped many of the earliest chapters of America’s story. Our common values and shared vision for the future laid the foundation for an eternal friendship between Ireland and the United States, and today, daughters and sons of Erin continue to enrich our Nation. This month, we reaffirm the bonds of affection between our two great countries, and we honor the courage and perseverance of the Irish-American community.

From ethereal green shores, generations of Irishmen and women set out across an ocean to seek a new life in the New World. Often without family or funds, these brave souls put their faith in the ideas at the heart of our democracy — that we make our own destiny, and if we work hard and live responsibly, we can build a better future for our children and grandchildren. Early immigrants from Ireland shaped our founding documents, and in the decades and centuries since, Irish-American heroes — like the courageous members of the Fighting 69th — have fought and died to protect a Government of, by, and for the people.

Today, tens of millions of Americans proudly trace their heritage to the Emerald Isle. They are descendants of our Founding Fathers, heirs to a resilient spirit forged during the Great Hunger and painful periods of discrimination, and the latest in a long line of Irish Americans who have poured their energy and passion into perfecting our Union. With grit and determination, they have enhanced our communities, bolstered our economy, and strengthened our Nation. And their brogue continues to ring out from our halls of government and every place people strive to make our society more free, more fair, and more just.

The Irish story is one of hope and resolve — in it Americans see our own dreams and aspirations. Our pasts are bound by blood and belief, by culture and commerce, and our futures are equally, inextricably linked. During Irish-American Heritage Month, let us celebrate the people-to-people ties between our nations and continue together our work to forge a brighter tomorrow for every American and Irish child.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim March 2015 as Irish-American Heritage Month. I call upon all Americans to observe this month with appropriate ceremonies, activities, and programs.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-seventh day of February, in the year of our Lord two thousand fifteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-ninth.

BARACK OBAMA

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Reply #3 posted 03/06/15 10:50am

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http://www.claddaghdesign...-ceremony/

St. Patrick’s Day Shamrock Ceremony

St. Patrick's Day shamrock

It’s St. Patrick’s Day weekend. We’ve shipped all our orders and are starting to decorate the workshop with shamrock!. As well as all the amazing parades and our love for turning famous landmarks green there is another event that is synonymous with St. Patrick’s Day, the shamrock ceremony in the White House.

Every year on March 17th our Taoiseach travels to Washington with a bowl of shamrock which is presented to the US president. I went trawling through photos to see if I could find out when this tradition started and when it became such a big white house party?!

It turns out we’ve been sending shamrock to the White House for over 60 years!

Eisenhower shamrock St. Patrick's DayIt first began in 1952 when the Irish ambassador in Washington, John Hearne, sent a box of shamrock to president Truman. This established relations between the two countries and in 1959 Irish president Sean T O’ Kelly visited the US for St. Patrick’s day. Eisenhower came to meet him at the airport and seizing the perfect photo opportunity O’ Kelly pinned the shamrock to Eisenhower’s lapel and so a tradition was born!

Since then we’ve seen many US presidents embrace the visit of the Irish to present the bowl of shamrock. I haven’t been able to find photos of all of them but here are just some of the many US Presidents who have celebrated St. Patrick’s day with the shamrock ceremony.

Kennedy shamrock St.Patrick's Day

Nixon shamrock

Bush shamrock St. Patrick's Day

Clinton Shamrock St. Patrick's Day

Obama shamrock
Over the years the ceremony has evolved to include political issues like the Northern Ireland peace process during Clinton’s presidency. And since the mid 90′s it seems to have turned into the party of the year with some of the best Irish musicians and entertainers invited to the event.

So there you go, a short history of the 60 years we’ve been delivering shamrock to America!

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Reply #4 posted 03/06/15 10:56am

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Reply #5 posted 03/06/15 11:21am

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The Irish Slave Trade – The Forgotten “White” Slaves

The Slaves That Time Forgot

Global Research, January 27, 2013
The Irish Slave Trade – The Forgotten “White” Slaves

They came as slaves; vast human cargo transported on tall British ships bound for the Americas. They were shipped by the hundreds of thousands and included men, women, and even the youngest of children.

Whenever they rebelled or even disobeyed an order, they were punished in the harshest ways. Slave owners would hang their human property by their hands and set their hands or feet on fire as one form of punishment. They were burned alive and had their heads placed on pikes in the marketplace as a warning to other captives.

We don’t really need to go through all of the gory details, do we? We know all too well the atrocities of the African slave trade.

But, are we talking about African slavery? King James II and Charles I also led a continued effort to enslave the Irish. Britain’s famed Oliver Cromwell furthered this practice of dehumanizing one’s next door neighbor.

The Irish slave trade began when James II sold 30,000 Irish prisoners as slaves to the New World. His Proclamation of 1625 required Irish political prisoners be sent overseas and sold to English settlers in the West Indies. By the mid 1600s, the Irish were the main slaves sold to Antigua and Montserrat. At that time, 70% of the total population of Montserrat were Irish slaves.

Ireland quickly became the biggest source of human livestock for English merchants. The majority of the early slaves to the New World were actually white.

From 1641 to 1652, over 500,000 Irish were killed by the English and another 300,000 were sold as slaves. Ireland’s population fell from about 1,500,000 to 600,000 in one single decade. Families were ripped apart as the British did not allow Irish dads to take their wives and children with them across the Atlantic. This led to a helpless population of homeless women and children. Britain’s solution was to auction them off as well.

During the 1650s, over 100,000 Irish children between the ages of 10 and 14 were taken from their parents and sold as slaves in the West Indies, Virginia and New England. In this decade, 52,000 Irish (mostly women and children) were sold to Barbados and Virginia. Another 30,000 Irish men and women were also transported and sold to the highest bidder. In 1656, Cromwell ordered that 2000 Irish children be taken to Jamaica and sold as slaves to English settlers.

Many people today will avoid calling the Irish slaves what they truly were: Slaves. They’ll come up with terms like “Indentured Servants” to describe what occurred to the Irish. However, in most cases from the 17th and 18th centuries, Irish slaves were nothing more than human cattle.

As an example, the African slave trade was just beginning during this same period. It is well recorded that African slaves, not tainted with the stain of the hated Catholic theology and more expensive to purchase, were often treated far better than their Irish counterparts.

African slaves were very expensive during the late 1600s (50 Sterling). Irish slaves came cheap (no more than 5 Sterling). If a planter whipped or branded or beat an Irish slave to death, it was never a crime. A death was a monetary setback, but far cheaper than killing a more expensive African. The English masters quickly began breeding the Irish women for both their own personal pleasure and for greater profit. Children of slaves were themselves slaves, which increased the size of the master’s free workforce. Even if an Irish woman somehow obtained her freedom, her kids would remain slaves of her master. Thus, Irish moms, even with this new found emancipation, would seldom abandon their kids and would remain in servitude.

In time, the English thought of a better way to use these women (in many cases, girls as young as 12) to increase their market share: The settlers began to breed Irish women and girls with African men to produce slaves with a distinct complexion. These new “mulatto” slaves brought a higher price than Irish livestock and, likewise, enabled the settlers to save money rather than purchase new African slaves. This practice of interbreeding Irish females with African men went on for several decades and was so widespread that, in 1681, legislation was passed “forbidding the practice of mating Irish slave women to African slave men for the purpose of producing slaves for sale.” In short, it was stopped only because it interfered with the profits of a large slave transport company.

England continued to ship tens of thousands of Irish slaves for more than a century. Records state that, after the 1798 Irish Rebellion, thousands of Irish slaves were sold to both America and Australia. There were horrible abuses of both African and Irish captives. One British ship even dumped 1,302 slaves into the Atlantic Ocean so that the crew would have plenty of food to eat.

There is little question that the Irish experienced the horrors of slavery as much (if not more in the 17th Century) as the Africans did. There is, also, very little question that those brown, tanned faces you witness in your travels to the West Indies are very likely a combination of African and Irish ancestry. In 1839, Britain finally decided on it’s own to end it’s participation in Satan’s highway to hell and stopped transporting slaves. While their decision did not stop pirates from doing what they desired, the new law slowly concluded THIS chapter of nightmarish Irish misery.

But, if anyone, black or white, believes that slavery was only an African experience, then they’ve got it completely wrong.

Irish slavery is a subject worth remembering, not erasing from our memories.

But, where are our public (and PRIVATE) schools???? Where are the history books? Why is it so seldom discussed?

Do the memories of hundreds of thousands of Irish victims merit more than a mention from an unknown writer?

Or is their story to be one that their English pirates intended: To (unlike the African book) have the Irish story utterly and completely disappear as if it never happened.

None of the Irish victims ever made it back to their homeland to describe their ordeal. These are the lost slaves; the ones that time and biased history books conveniently forgot.

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Reply #6 posted 03/06/15 11:59am

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The contents of the link is way too much to post. I'll just post the link and paste a snippet of the article.

http://www.irishhistoryli...ocide.html


Author unknown

An Argument that the Irish Famine was Genocide

A controversial look at how the "Great Potato Famine" of Ireland in the 19th century. It was not a famine as there was plenty of food other than potatoes. The British government stood idly by and let millions of Irish die in what is now being called genocide.

A blight upon the potatoes of Ireland forever changed the histories of Ireland, England, and the United States of America. The blight that we now know was a water mold (and not a fungus as originally believed), Phytophthora infestans, attacked the cash crop of the Irish Catholic peasant farmer. This was the crop with which the Irish paid their rent to the English and Protestant landlords............



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Reply #7 posted 03/06/15 2:06pm

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A fascinating book from Noel Ignatiev, "How the Irish Became White"

http://books.google.com/b...ztAAAAMAAJ

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Reply #8 posted 03/09/15 6:55am

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http://www.forbes.com/sit...ish-towns/

America's Most Irish Towns

Trulia‘s Chief Economist looks at Census data to reveal where most Irish-Americans live today, and where international house hunters from Ireland are looking for homes in the U.S.

On St. Patrick’s Day, everyone is Irish. But what about the rest of the year? Twenty-two million Americans — 7.2% of the population – say their “primary ancestry” is Irish, according to the Census’s American Community Survey. Another 13.5 million Americans claim at least some Irish ancestry, bringing the total to 35.5 million Americans — 11.6% of the population — with at least partial Irish ancestry. If that sounds low, remember that Ireland’s population today is just 6.4 million – 4.6 million in the Republic of Ireland and 1.8 million in Northern Ireland. So there are more than 5 times as many Americans with at least partial Irish ancestry as there are people who live in Ireland.

Irish-Americans are strongly concentrated in the Northeast. The percentage of people with primary Irish ancestry tops out at 20% in the Boston metro area, followed by Middlesex County, MA (west of Boston) and Peabody, MA (north of Boston). The top six metros are all in Massachusetts or upstate New York:

America’s Most Irish Metros

# U.S. Metro % Irish ancestry
1 Boston, MA

20.4%

2 Middlesex County, MA

16.9%

3 Peabody, MA

15.8%

4 Albany, NY

15.6%

5 Syracuse, NY

15.0%

6 Worcester, MA

14.8%

7 Camden, NJ

14.8%

8 Philadelphia, PA

14.2%

9 Long Island, NY

13.1%

10 Wilmington, DE-MD-NJ

13.0%

Among 100 largest metros. Primary Irish ancestry only.

Irish-Americans are at least 5% of the population in most counties across the U.S., and 10% or more in most of New England, New York state, New Jersey, eastern Pennsylvania, and other smaller counties across the country. At the other extreme, Miami is just 1% Irish:

U.S. Map of Where Irish-Americans Live

Map of Irish-Americans in Eastern MassachusettsMap of Irish-Americans in New York

Map of Irish-Americans in Philadelphia

Finally, where are people from Ireland looking for vacation homes in the U.S.? Trulia search traffic reveals that the traditional vacation or resort towns with the highest share of foreign searches coming from Ireland are on Cape Cod, MA, including the communities of Dennis Port, Cotuit, West Yarmouth, and North Falmouth, as well as Boothbay Harbor, ME. But there are some differences between where Irish-Americans live and where people from Ireland are looking at homes in America. Lake County-Kenosha County, IL-WI, which is north of Chicago, and Raleigh, NC, both rank near the middle of the 100 largest metros in Irish-American population but are on the top 10 list for share of search traffic coming from Ireland. In the other direction, Camden, NJ, and Wilmington, DE, both are among the top 10 metros for Irish-American population (see chart above), but rank much lower (48th and 71st, respectively) in share of search traffic coming from Ireland today.

Therefore, people from Ireland are searching more in places with large Irish-American populations. America’s most Irish towns today are likely to remain strongly Irish for many St. Patrick Days to come.

America’s Top Irish Neighborhoods
Even though Irish-Americans make up just 5% of the New York metro population overall– less than the national average and only one-quarter the share in Boston – the neighborhood with the highest percentage of Irish-Americans is Breezy Point /Rockaway Point in Queens (ZIP code 11697). Most recently, this neighborhood is known for having had significant Hurricane Sandy damage:

America’s Top Irish Neighborhoods

#

ZIP code

Neighborhood

Area

% Irish ancestry

1

11697

Breezy Point /
Rockaway Point

Queens,
New York, neighborhood

54.3%

2

11569

Point Lookout

Long Island South Shore suburb

45.6%

3

10965

Pearl River

New York northern suburb

43.4%

4

60655

Mount Greenwood

Chicago Southwest Side neighborhood

40.7%

5

02081

Walpole

Boston southern suburb

40.0%

6

19022

Crum Lynne

Philadelphia western suburb

39.2%

7

02190

South Weymouth

Boston South Shore suburb

38.6%

8

02351

Abington

Boston South Shore suburb

38.1%

9

02050

Marshfield

Boston South Shore suburb

37.5%

10

02191

North Weymouth

Boston South Shore suburb

37.4%

Primary Irish ancestry only.
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Reply #9 posted 03/12/15 10:34am

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Reply #10 posted 03/12/15 12:10pm

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Top ten strangest events to report this St. Patrick’s season

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Reply #11 posted 03/13/15 3:32am

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luv4u said:

The contents of the link is way too much to post. I'll just post the link and paste a snippet of the article.

http://www.irishhistoryli...ocide.html


Author unknown

An Argument that the Irish Famine was Genocide

A controversial look at how the "Great Potato Famine" of Ireland in the 19th century. It was not a famine as there was plenty of food other than potatoes. The British government stood idly by and let millions of Irish die in what is now being called genocide.

A blight upon the potatoes of Ireland forever changed the histories of Ireland, England, and the United States of America. The blight that we now know was a water mold (and not a fungus as originally believed), Phytophthora infestans, attacked the cash crop of the Irish Catholic peasant farmer. This was the crop with which the Irish paid their rent to the English and Protestant landlords............



The British did that here, too, as one of their many measures taken to try to eradicate Highland (Gaelic) culture. Other measures included (but not limited to) proscriptive laws and good old fashioned groups of soldiers going around massacring people.

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Reply #12 posted 03/13/15 3:35am

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St Patrick - probably a slave-trader who fled to Ireland.

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Reply #13 posted 03/13/15 11:48am

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Saint Patrick (window).jpg

a 5th-century Romano-British Christian missionary and bishop in Ireland. Known as the "Apostle of Ireland", he is the primary patron saint of Ireland, along with Saints Brigit and Columba.

The dates of Patrick's life cannot be fixed with certainty but, on a widespread interpretation, he was active as a missionary in Ireland during the second half of the fifth century.[5] He is generally credited with being the first bishop of Armagh, Primate of Ireland.

According to the Confessio of Patrick, when he was about 16, he was captured by Irish pirates from his home in Britain, and taken as a slave to Ireland, where he lived for six years before escaping and returning to his family. After becoming a cleric, he returned to northern and western Ireland. In later life, he served as an ordained bishop, but little is known about the places where he worked. By the seventh century, he had already come to be revered as the patron saint of Ireland.

Saint Patrick's Day is observed on 17 March, which is said to be the date of his death.[6] It is celebrated inside and outside Ireland as a religious and cultural holiday. In the dioceses of Ireland, it is both a solemnity and a holy day of obligation; it is also a celebration of Ireland itself.

http://en.wikipedia.org/w...nt_Patrick

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Reply #14 posted 03/13/15 6:43pm

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Famous Irish American Actors

Irish Americans have a long, proud history of performing on the stage and screen. Many of the greatest films and TV shows of all time feature Irish Americans in principal roles, and many Irish American movies have been produced since the early days of cinema. Yet you may be surprised to discover some of the actors who come from an Irish American heritage.
The following is a detailed list of Irish American film and television actors, listed in order by year of birth. You may associate some of these movie stars with being Jewish, Italian, or another ethnicity or nationality. But all the actors on this list share one thing in common: they all have at least one parent or grandparent of Irish descent. And in some cases, the actor was born in Ireland and later became a U.S. citizen.

Irish American Actors Born before 1920

James Cagney
Eddie Foy (1856–1928)
George M. Cohan (1878–1942)
Sara Allgood (1879–1950)
Lon Chaney Sr. (1883–1930)
Walter Brennan (1884–1974)
Gracie Allen (1895–1964)
Buster Keaton (1895–1966)
Pat O'Brien (1899–1983)
James Cagney (1899–1986)
Spencer Tracy (1900–1967)
Helen Hayes (1900–1993)
Bing Crosby (1903–1977)
Joan Crawford (1903–1977)
James Dunn (1905–1967)
Eddie Foy Jr. (1905–1983)
Lon Chaney Jr. (1906–1973)
John Huston (1906–1987)
John Wayne (1907–1979)
Barbara Stanwyck (1907–1990)
Errol Flynn (1909–1959)
Lucille Ball (1911–1989)
Ronald Reagan (1911–2004)
Gene Kelly (1912–1996)
Burt Lancaster (1913–1994)
Geraldine Fitzgerald (1913–2005)
Tyrone Power (1914–1958)
Arthur Kennedy (1914–1990)
Dorothy Lamour (1914–1996)
Edmond O'Brien (1915–1985)
Anthony Quinn (1915–2001)
Jackie Gleason (1916–1987)
Gregory Peck (1916–2003)
Rita Hayworth (1918–1987)
Art Carney (1918–2003)
Virginia O'Brien (1919–2001)

Irish American Actors Born in the 1920s

Gene Tierney
Gene Tierney (1920–1991)
Jack Lord (1920–1998)
Maureen O'Hara (1920–)
Steve Allen (1921–2000)
Judy Garland (1922–1969)
Cleo Moore (1924–1973)
Carroll O'Connor (1924–2001)
Marlon Brando (1924–2004)
Donald O'Connor (1925–2003)
Maureen Stapleton (1925–2006)
Jack Cassidy (1927–1976)
Eileen Ryan (1927–)
Rosemary Clooney (1928–2002)
Patrick McGoohan (1928–2009)
Grace Kelly (1929–1982)
Anne Meara (1929–)

Irish American Actors Born in the 1930s

Clint Eastwood
Clint Eastwood (1930–)
Stephen Boyd (1931–1977)
Bryan O'Byrne (1931–2009)
James Earl Jones (1931–)
Malachy McCourt (1931–)
Roy Scheider (1932–2008)
Eileen Brennan (1932–)
Peter Boyle (1935–2006)
Bernie McInerney (1936–)
Robert Redford (1936–)
George Carlin (1937–2008)
Jack Nicholson (1937–)
Brian Dennehy (1938–)
Mike Farrell (1939–)

Irish American Actors Born in the 1940s

Martin Sheen
Martin Sheen (1940–)
Michael Moriarty (1941–)
Ryan O'Neal (1941–)
Dennis Holahan (1942–)
Harrison Ford (1942–)
Robert De Niro (1943–)
Teri Garr (1944–)
Mia Farrow (1945–)
Bud Cort (1946–)
Diane Keaton (1946–)
Joe Estevez (1946–)
Liza Minnelli (1946–)
Patty Duke (1946–)
Susan Sarandon (1946–)
Suzanne Somers (1946–)
Kevin Kline (1947–)
Armand Assante (1949–)

Irish American Actors Born in the 1950s

Mickey Rourke
Bll Murray (1950–)
John Sayles (1950–)
Annette O'Toole (1952–)
Jeff Fahey (1952–)
Mickey Rourke (1952–)
Terry O'Quinn (1952–)
Lenny Clarke (1953–)
John Travolta (1954–)
Kate Mulgrew (1955–)
Michael O'Keefe (1955–)
Peter Gallagher (1955–)
Bill Maher (1956–)
Bo Derek (1956–)
David Caruso (1956–)
Mel Gibson (1956–)
Nathan Lane (1956–)
Tim Daly (1956–)
Denis Leary (1957–)
Steve Buscemi (1957–)
Alec Baldwin (1958–)
Marg Helgenberger (1958–)
Julia Sweeney (1959)
Patricia Heaton (1958–)
Colin Quinn (1959--)
James McCaffrey (1959–)
John C. McGinley (1959–)

Irish American Actors Born in the 1960s

Sean Penn
Daniel Baldwin (1960–)
Kathy Griffin (1960–)
Neil Flynn (1960–)
Sean Penn (1960–)
Bonnie Hunt (1961–)
Dylan McDermott (1961)
George Clooney (1961–)
Emilio Estevez (1962–)
Karen Duffy (1962–)
Matthew Broderick (1962–)
Rosie O'Donnell (1962–)
Tom Cruise (1962–)
Conan O'Brien (1963–)
Johnny Depp (1963–)
Ramon Estevez (1963–)
Tatum O'Neal (1963–)
William Baldwin (1963–)
Chris Farley (1964–1997)
Andrew Wilson (1964–)
Janeane Garofalo (1964–)
Matt Dillon (1964–)
Molly Shannon (1964–)
Stephen Colbert (1964–)
Chris Penn (1965–2006)
Ben Stiller (1965–)
Charlie Sheen (1965–)
John C. Reilly (1965–)
Maura Tierney (1965–)
Robert Downey, Jr. (1965–)
William Mapother (1965–)
Dean Cain (1966–)
John Cusack (1966–)
Mike O'Malley (1966–)
Neal McDonough (1966–)
Patrick Dempsey (1966–)
Stephen Baldwin (1966–)
Courtney Thorne-Smith (1967–)
Kate Walsh (1967–)
Lauren Graham (1967–)
Paul Giamatti (1967–)
Renée Estevez (1967–)
Anthony Michael Hall (1968–)
Brendan Fraser (1968–)
Edward Burns (1968–)
James Caviezel (1968–)
Jorja Fox (1968–)
Lucy Lawless (1968–)
Moira Kelly (1968–)
Owen Wilson (1968–)
Donnie Wahlberg (1969–)
Ellen Pompeo (1969–)
Matthew McConaughey (1969–)

Irish American Actors Born in the 1970s

Jennifer Connelly
Chris O'Donnell (1970–)
Dominic Purcell (1970–)
Heather Graham (1970–)
Jamie Kennedy (1970–)
Jennifer Connelly (1970–)
Julie Bowen (1970–)
Lara Flynn Boyle (1970–)
Vince Vaughan (1970–)
Ana Ortiz (1971–)
Bridget Moynahan (1971–)
Carla Gugino (1971–)
Eric Mabius (1971–)
Luke Wilson (1971–)
Mark Wahlberg (1971–)
Monica Potter (1971–)
Renee O'Connor (1971–)
Sean Astin (1971–)
Shannen Doherty (1971–)
Angie Harmon (1972–)
Ben Affleck (1972–)
Dane Cook (1972–)
Jenny McCarthy (1972–)
Robin Tunney (1972–)
Mackenzie Astin (1973–)
Paul Walker (1973–)
Rose McGowan (1973–)
Alyson Hannigan (1974–)
Jerry O'Connell (1974–)
Kevin M. Connolly (1974–)
Casey Affleck (1975–)
Charlie O'Connell (1975–)
Danica McKellar (1975–)
Danny Masterson (1976–)
Drew Barrymore (1975–)
Emily Deschanel (1976–)
Brittany Murphy (1977–2009)
Zachary Quinto (1977–)
A. J. Buckley (1978–)
Ashton Kutcher (1978–)
Eddie Cahill (1978–)
Joshua Jackson (1978–)
Katherine Heigl (1978–)
Josh Hartnett (1978–)
Maggie Q (1979–)

Irish American Actors Born in the 1980s

Anne Hathaway
Christopher Masterson (1980–)
Macaulay Culkin (1980–)
Zooey Deschanel (1980–)
Chris Evans (1981–)
Julia Stiles (1981–)
Anne Hathaway (1982–)
Jessica Sutta (1982–)
Jonathan Tucker (1982–)
Kieran Culkin (1982–)
Michelle Lombardo (1983–)
Jake T. Austin (1994–)
Mandy Moore (1984–)
Olivia Wilde (1984–)
Scarlett Keegan (1984–)
David Gallagher (1985–)
Lindsay Lohan (1986–)
Megan Fox (1986–)
Mischa Barton (1986–)
Kevin Jonas (1987–)
Vanessa Hudgens (1988–)
Joe Jonas (1989–)
Rory Culkin (1989–)

Irish American Actors Born since 1990

Demi Lovato (1992–)
Nick Jonas (1992–)
AnnaSophia Robb (1993–)
Dakota Fanning (1994–)
Abigail Breslin (1996–)
Elle Fanning (1998–)
woot!

“Transracial is a term that has long since been defined as the adoption of a child that is of a different race than the adoptive parents,” : https://thinkprogress.org...fb6e18544a
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Reply #15 posted 03/17/15 5:59am

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Reply #16 posted 03/17/15 6:05am

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Lianachan said:

St Patrick - probably a slave-trader who fled to Ireland.

Saint Patrick (Patricius) was Italian by heritage. His parents, Calpurnius and Conchessa, were Roman (Italian) citizens living in Britain, most likely Scotland. Calpurnius, Patrick's father, was a high Roman diplomat living in England, but a Roman citizen.

According to the Confessio of Patricius
His area was captured at one point by the Irish and he was forced into slavery. At 21 years old, he escaped slavery. He make it back to Rome to find that most of the Roman empire had been lost. After some time he felt that God was calling him back to Ireland. He spent 10 years in France studying religion when the Pope (Celestine) made him a Bishop. He later became known as the patron saint of Ireland. Saint Patrick's Day is celebrated every March 17.

Patrick recounts that he had a vision a few years after returning home:

I saw a man coming, as it were from Ireland. His name was Victoricus, and he carried many letters, and he gave me one of them. I read the heading: "The Voice of the Irish". As I began the letter, I imagined in that moment that I heard the voice of those very people who were near the wood of Foclut, which is beside the western sea—and they cried out, as with one voice: "We appeal to you, holy servant boy, to come and walk among us."

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Reply #17 posted 03/17/15 8:30am

SuperFurryAnim
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Have a Happy Saint Patrick's Day!

What are you outraged about today? CNN has not told you yet?
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Reply #18 posted 03/17/15 9:27am

Lianachan

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OldFriends4Sale said:

Lianachan said:

St Patrick - probably a slave-trader who fled to Ireland.

Saint Patrick (Patricius) was Italian by heritage. His parents, Calpurnius and Conchessa, were Roman (Italian) citizens living in Britain, most likely Scotland. Calpurnius, Patrick's father, was a high Roman diplomat living in England, but a Roman citizen.

According to the Confessio of Patricius
His area was captured at one point by the Irish and he was forced into slavery. At 21 years old, he escaped slavery. He make it back to Rome to find that most of the Roman empire had been lost. After some time he felt that God was calling him back to Ireland. He spent 10 years in France studying religion when the Pope (Celestine) made him a Bishop. He later became known as the patron saint of Ireland. Saint Patrick's Day is celebrated every March 17.

Patrick recounts that he had a vision a few years after returning home:

I saw a man coming, as it were from Ireland. His name was Victoricus, and he carried many letters, and he gave me one of them. I read the heading: "The Voice of the Irish". As I began the letter, I imagined in that moment that I heard the voice of those very people who were near the wood of Foclut, which is beside the western sea—and they cried out, as with one voice: "We appeal to you, holy servant boy, to come and walk among us."

I'm aware of the accepted story of his background - the link I posted raises some academic doubts about it.

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Reply #19 posted 03/17/15 12:45pm

free2bfreeda

Happy 'Irish Heritage Month' and day.

although i do not imbibe, i wish a safe, wonderful and celebritory st patrick day. me tanks to all for celebrating you with us all.

i hope you'll be having a good evening with lotsa fun and joy. (be sure to get a designated driver boyoos)

here's a neat site for irish heritage root seekers: http://www.gaelicmatters....words.html

“Transracial is a term that has long since been defined as the adoption of a child that is of a different race than the adoptive parents,” : https://thinkprogress.org...fb6e18544a
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Reply #20 posted 03/17/15 1:37pm

free2bfreeda

luv4u said:

The contents of the link is way too much to post. I'll just post the link and paste a snippet of the article.

http://www.irishhistoryli...ocide.html


Author unknown

An Argument that the Irish Famine was Genocide

A controversial look at how the "Great Potato Famine" of Ireland in the 19th century. It was not a famine as there was plenty of food other than potatoes. The British government stood idly by and let millions of Irish die in what is now being called genocide.

A blight upon the potatoes of Ireland forever changed the histories of Ireland, England, and the United States of America. The blight that we now know was a water mold (and not a fungus as originally believed), Phytophthora infestans, attacked the cash crop of the Irish Catholic peasant farmer. This was the crop with which the Irish paid their rent to the English and Protestant landlords............



the link you provided was a very interesting and informative. i remember in some of my former post about the irish being enslaved by england one reference - : http://www.rhettaakamatsu...slaves.htm

when the movie 'gangs of new york', came out i really applauded liam neesanm leonardo de caprio, daniel day lewis and carmeron diaz for their portrayals of how the irish were treated so poorly right here in america.

now i know danial day lewis' role was the villian, and he played it well. ( he lookted good smile )

but i digress, after seeing that movie i looked up some info on why the irish were treated so unfairly in the u.s.

wikipedia gave a pretty good overview: http://en.wikipedia.org/w..._sentiment

the hatred and ill treatment by the english over the irish was all about:

Cuius regio, eius religio is a Latin phrase which literally means "Whose realm, his religion", meaning that the religion of the ruler was to dictate the religion of those ruled.

eek

why has religion been so mis used by humans?

>

anyway luv4u, i hope you don't mind my posting some more root info. i find this very eye opeining.

Views of the Famine

Contemporary newspaper articles and illustrations from the Great Hunger in Ireland, 1845-52

The Pictorial Times

List of Articles

Irish Agitation and Destitution, Aug 22, 1846

Food riots in Ireland, Oct. 10, 1846

Irish Relief, Jan 30, 1847

Famine in Ireland, Oct. 30, 1847

List of Illustrations
(These images can also be browsed in the Pictorial Times Gallery.)

Peasant cottage interior (Jan 24, 1846)

Peasantry on the O’Connell farms (Jan 31, 1846)

An Irish cabin in Derrynane Beg (Feb 7 1846)

Peasant cottage interior (Feb 7, 1846)

Interior of a small farme...in Ireland (Feb 7, 1846)

Beggars on the O’Connell estate (Feb 14, 1846)

A potato dinner (Feb 28, 1846)

Farmer taking potatoes to market (Feb 28, 1846)

Irish emigrants on the Mersey (June 6, 1846)

Irish cabin (Aug 22 1846)

Food riots in Dungarvan (Oct 10, 1846)

Cahirciveen, the retreat ... Liberator (Oct 10, 1846)

A farming family defending their home (Jan 2, 1847)

Relief for Ireland (Jan 30, 1847)

Food supplies under military escort (Oct 30, 1847)

Irish armed peasants wait... meal cart (Oct 30, 1847)

[Edited 3/17/15 13:48pm]

“Transracial is a term that has long since been defined as the adoption of a child that is of a different race than the adoptive parents,” : https://thinkprogress.org...fb6e18544a
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Reply #21 posted 03/17/15 3:53pm

SquirrelMeat

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Bearing in mind that the largest heritage in the U.S. is from England, is there an English Heritage Month?

.
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Reply #22 posted 03/17/15 5:28pm

Pokeno4Money

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OldFriends4Sale said:


This actually makes sense, considering St Joseph's Day is March 19th shrug

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Reply #23 posted 03/18/15 2:40am

Lianachan

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SquirrelMeat said:

Bearing in mind that the largest heritage in the U.S. is from England, is there an English Heritage Month?

St Patrick's day is very well marketed. We even have people "celebrating" it (by wearing green and drinking Guinness) up here, while our own St. Andrew's day passed largely unnoticed.

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Reply #24 posted 03/19/15 5:36pm

SquirrelMeat

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Lianachan said:

SquirrelMeat said:

Bearing in mind that the largest heritage in the U.S. is from England, is there an English Heritage Month?

St Patrick's day is very well marketed. We even have people "celebrating" it (by wearing green and drinking Guinness) up here, while our own St. Andrew's day passed largely unnoticed.


Strange isn't it? You would think, based on the impact and history of the Scottish and English (from both the immigration and invention front), that there would be more rememberance, particularly in the USA.

Abroad, Scotland seems to be forgotten and England carry the bagagge of the bad elements of the old Empire.

.
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Reply #25 posted 03/20/15 5:32am

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SquirrelMeat said:

Bearing in mind that the largest heritage in the U.S. is from England, is there an English Heritage Month?

I think because the 'foundation' of our countries culture is English, it's just a given...

Even 'Black-Americans' were suprised when they found out 'jumping the broom' was an English thing

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Reply #26 posted 03/20/15 5:36am

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http://riverdance.com/usa/

(New York, NY) Moya Doherty is proud to announce the international Irish dance phenomenon is back by popular demand with Riverdance – The 20th Anniversary World Tour, which is celebrating an extraordinary milestone for an incredible show, as it makes stops in over 60 North American cities during the 2015/2016 season.

The Edinburgh Evening News raves about Riverdance – The 20th Anniversary World Tour,

“As for the flaws? Well, there simply aren’t any. Here’s to another 20 years!”

Riverdance – The 20th Anniversary World Tour, composed by Bill Whelan, produced by Moya Doherty and directed by John McColgan, is currently celebrating a sold out, critically acclaimed run across Europe and Asia and will arrive in North America in fall 2015.
To mark the eagerly awaited return of the show to North America, ending a four-year absence, Riverdance – The 20th Anniversary World Tour will feature new costumes, new lighting, new projections and the addition of a brand new number, “Anna Livia,” featuring the female members of the Irish dance troupe in an acapella hard-shoe number.

The success of Riverdance across the whole world has gone beyond our wildest dreams,” said producer Moya Doherty. “The fact that the show continues to draw and excite audiences is a tribute to every dancer, singer, musician, staff and crew member who have dedicated themselves to the show. This 20th Anniversary Tour is a thank you to our audiences and a celebration of what has been an incredible journey across two decades.

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Reply #27 posted 03/20/15 5:38am

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http://dancesofhistory.we...dance.html

History of Irish Riverdance

Irish dancing has made huge progress throughout the centuries, changing through the centuries based on the population and migration of people. The earliest known Irish dancing was the Druids in 400 AD, who performed rituals honouring the oak tree and the sun. In the 18th century, the master of dance arrived in Ireland dancing from village to village. His pupils did not know the difference between their left and right feet, causing them now to think mechanically, but will feeling. At the end of the 18th century is when Irish step dancing became more known throughout Ireland. Hornpipe shoes and peasant dresses are the typical visual of an Irish step dancer. Irish River dancing start in Dublin, Ireland in 1995, as an enhancement of a seven-minute intermission piece in the Eurovision Song Contest in 1994. This type of dancing is a more development form of Irish step-dancing which included tight arms, stiff upper body, and little emotion. Typical Irish dancing includes Irish music, Irish dancing of course, and a typical Irish setting which includes a Celtic Rock or Stonehedge background. It has become an international phenomenon, with students filling the dancing schools of Ireland to learn to dance like the great Michael Flatley and Jean Butler.


The video below is a typical Irish River dance Performance. The fast legs, stiff upper body, Irish music, and quick movements are what make this River dancing.

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Reply #28 posted 03/20/15 8:07am

ISF

It angers me whenever I see a ''Cromwell Road'', "Cromwell Street" etc.

To name a place after a mass murderer and enslaver of people is a truly shameful thing.

One part of Ireland still remains under British occupation. Hopefully it will become free, and be part of Ireland once again.

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Reply #29 posted 03/20/15 8:15am

Lianachan

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ISF said:

It angers me whenever I see a ''Cromwell Road'', "Cromwell Street" etc.


To name a place after a mass murderer and enslaver of people is a truly shameful thing.



One part of Ireland still remains under British occupation. Hopefully it will become free, and be part of Ireland once again.



We have those here too, although mainly because they are the roads leading to forts his hostile occupying army built, rather than being named after him. Particularly annoying, though, are the modern names of the towns Fort William and Fort Augustus - both named after Butcher Cumberland, under whose tender care was carried out genocide, cultural and ethnic cleansing in the Highlands.
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