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Thread started 05/29/12 11:19am

spookymuffin

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Mad Men

Don't you just love it?

It's my weekly dose of glamorous, unabashed nostalgia and just oozes sex. It's the very definition of beguiling.

It also manages to keep surprising me, from LSD to character departures. It's cracking stuff.

Who watches it, who loves it? Who has no idea what I'm talking about and wishes I had never come back to this site and were instead lying dead in a dumpster somewhere on top of Amy Winehouse's heroin-addled alcohol corpse?

Sound off.

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Reply #1 posted 05/29/12 11:34am

Phishanga

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worship

Probably one of the two best shows on TV right now, with Breaking Bad.

Hey loudmouth, shut the fuck up, right?
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Reply #2 posted 05/29/12 12:22pm

Poplife88

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I am SO into this show right now. The last few episodes esp have been eek !

We're gonna need a bigger boat
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Reply #3 posted 05/29/12 12:39pm

unique

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nostalgia? wtf? that's what my office is like today. it's like a documentary to me

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Reply #4 posted 05/29/12 12:50pm

Phishanga

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unique said:

nostalgia? wtf? that's what my office is like today. it's like a documentary to me

No kidding?! Got a free position? biggrin

Hey loudmouth, shut the fuck up, right?
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Reply #5 posted 05/29/12 1:51pm

NDRU

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Best show ever

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Reply #6 posted 05/29/12 1:57pm

spookymuffin

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Phishanga said:

worship



Probably one of the two best shows on TV right now, with Breaking Bad.



Fuck yeah, Breaking Bad is great too! This season coming is the last season. I think they've made the right decision there. Last season stretched the limits of suspension of disbelief towards the end, I felt.

After that, I'm not sure what's left to watch. I hear Girls is good? The House finale was like a gnat's orgasm given the show's previous writing quality. So unbelievably disappointing.
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Reply #7 posted 05/29/12 2:53pm

Shanti0608

spookymuffin said:

Phishanga said:

worship

Probably one of the two best shows on TV right now, with Breaking Bad.

Fuck yeah, Breaking Bad is great too! This season coming is the last season. I think they've made the right decision there. Last season stretched the limits of suspension of disbelief towards the end, I felt. After that, I'm not sure what's left to watch. I hear Girls is good? The House finale was like a gnat's orgasm given the show's previous writing quality. So unbelievably disappointing.

It was so disappointing!

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Reply #8 posted 05/29/12 3:33pm

sextonseven

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This is my favorite show, but I haven't watched any of season five yet. I'll be back to comment in a few weeks after I've cleared out the DVR probably after the season finale.

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Reply #9 posted 05/29/12 3:36pm

spookymuffin

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Shanti0608 said:



spookymuffin said:


Phishanga said:

worship



Probably one of the two best shows on TV right now, with Breaking Bad.



Fuck yeah, Breaking Bad is great too! This season coming is the last season. I think they've made the right decision there. Last season stretched the limits of suspension of disbelief towards the end, I felt. After that, I'm not sure what's left to watch. I hear Girls is good? The House finale was like a gnat's orgasm given the show's previous writing quality. So unbelievably disappointing.

It was so disappointing!



Hello gorgeous. :)

It was sickening! I was furious, and so many peoe praised it! It was so bland and predictable. Imagine if they'd engaged with something truly thought-provoking, like House becoming religious as he faced death. That would have been so interesting!
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Reply #10 posted 05/29/12 3:39pm

NDRU

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sextonseven said:

This is my favorite show, but I haven't watched any of season five yet. I'll be back to comment in a few weeks after I've cleared out the DVR probably after the season finale.

Yeah I don't have cable, so I am a season behind.

But it's definitely my favorite show right now. Breaking Bad is great, but the coincidences are a little difficult to take sometimes.

Mad Men is just about perfect.

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Reply #11 posted 05/29/12 4:07pm

Shanti0608

spookymuffin said:

Shanti0608 said:

It was so disappointing!

Hello gorgeous. smile It was sickening! I was furious, and so many peoe praised it! It was so bland and predictable. Imagine if they'd engaged with something truly thought-provoking, like House becoming religious as he faced death. That would have been so interesting!

Hi handsome kiss2

I have to say that I haven't watched House in a few years so I was a bit lost. I didn't know that he was arrested. I only happened to catch it because the tv was set to that channel after watching the news/weather due to a tropical storm. So, I figured I would catch the last episodes since I watched the show in the very beginning. I now wish I had not wasted those 2 hours.

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Reply #12 posted 05/29/12 4:17pm

spookymuffin

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Shanti0608 said:



spookymuffin said:


Shanti0608 said:


It was so disappointing!



Hello gorgeous. smile It was sickening! I was furious, and so many peoe praised it! It was so bland and predictable. Imagine if they'd engaged with something truly thought-provoking, like House becoming religious as he faced death. That would have been so interesting!

Hi handsome kiss2




I have to say that I haven't watched House in a few years so I was a bit lost. I didn't know that he was arrested. I only happened to catch it because the tv was set to that channel after watching the news/weather due to a tropical storm. So, I figured I would catch the last episodes since I watched the show in the very beginning. I now wish I had not wasted those 2 hours.




Time for a threadjack.

Facebook says you live in the States now? How's life with you and Phil? And the wee nipper?
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Reply #13 posted 05/29/12 4:17pm

spookymuffin

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PS To keep things on-topic, Roger Sterling is the shit.
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Reply #14 posted 05/29/12 4:44pm

Shanti0608

spookymuffin said:

PS To keep things on-topic, Roger Sterling is the shit.

I have to admit, I haven't seen Mad Men. I do not catch much tv apart from a few things that we DVR and watch after the small person goes to bed.

We are all doing well, thank you big grin

The wee nipper will be 3 in Oct.

Hope you are doing well.

hug

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Reply #15 posted 05/29/12 5:52pm

lazycrockett

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I cant believe they whored out Joan. bawl bawl bawl bawl

The Most Important Thing In Life Is Sincerity....Once You Can Fake That, You Can Fake Anything.
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Reply #16 posted 05/30/12 3:10am

Harlepolis

My fave show after Twin Peaks.

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Reply #17 posted 05/30/12 6:09am

spookymuffin

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Harlepolis said:

My fave show after Twin Peaks.



But but but what about Game of Thrones? Or The Wire? Or The Sopranos?

But yes, Twin Peaks is fucking awesome. The theme tune alone is great.
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Reply #18 posted 05/30/12 6:10am

spookymuffin

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Shanti0608 said:



spookymuffin said:


PS To keep things on-topic, Roger Sterling is the shit.

I have to admit, I haven't seen Mad Men. I do not catch much tv apart from a few things that we DVR and watch after the small person goes to bed.


We are all doing well, thank you big grin


The wee nipper will be 3 in Oct.



Hope you are doing well.


hug



Nothing to complain about, I must say. Just about to get the old career going, hopefully.

Three, you say? How time has flown. omg
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Reply #19 posted 05/30/12 7:29am

Harlepolis

spookymuffin said:

Harlepolis said:

My fave show after Twin Peaks.

But but but what about Game of Thrones? Or The Wire? Or The Sopranos? But yes, Twin Peaks is fucking awesome. The theme tune alone is great.

I like 'em all, but those two catered to my preferences smile

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Reply #20 posted 05/30/12 9:04am

ufoclub

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lazycrockett said:

I cant believe they whored out Joan. bawl bawl bawl bawl

I wonder if she'll wear that necklace?

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Reply #21 posted 05/30/12 10:56am

Phishanga

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spookymuffin said:

Shanti0608 said:

It was so disappointing!

Hello gorgeous. smile It was sickening! I was furious, and so many peoe praised it! It was so bland and predictable. Imagine if they'd engaged with something truly thought-provoking, like House becoming religious as he faced death. That would have been so interesting!

House becoming religious? Nah.... In a sense, I feel the same about the House finale as I felt about the Lost finale. The story didn't really work (and I'm REALLY suspicious anytime they do dream / hallucinations scenes...), I expected something else but from a character point of view, I think it was great. House deciding against being a doctor for 5 months with Wilson - nice. And it wasn't too happy either because of all that had to be sacrificed.

Anyway, back to Mad Men. lol

Hey loudmouth, shut the fuck up, right?
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Reply #22 posted 07/05/12 9:07am

sextonseven

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I FINALLY finished watching season five this week. I like in the finale how Don interpreted the removal of his rotten tooth as the bitterness leaving him that he displayed towards everyone and was subsequently much nicer to Megan and Peggy.

And then at the end, he's approached by two women who ask if he's single and the episode stops before he gives an answer. After being faithful for the entire season, is the old Don back? It's a frustratingly good cliffhanger I thought.

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Reply #23 posted 07/05/12 1:31pm

Graycap23

NDRU said:

Best show ever

Better than 24? What is this show about?

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Reply #24 posted 07/06/12 4:50am

ufoclub

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January Jones is, after seeing her on these seasons of Mad Men and then also the recent X-Men movie... a bad actress. Horrible!

[Edited 7/6/12 5:13am]

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Reply #25 posted 07/06/12 4:54am

ZombieKitten

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I never got into it sad only ever saw that one episode at sextonseven's place in 2009.

If only it was a comedy and only 25 minute episodes, something more for my attention span

mr.green

I'm the mistake you wanna make
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Reply #26 posted 07/06/12 6:21am

OldFriends4Sal
e

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moderator

LOVE MAd mEN, love it, and I didn't know my mom loves it too

love show that able to capture the time period they are portraying

this is one of those that I will buy the dvd sets

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence
I will make you cyber shit in your pants!
What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In
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Reply #27 posted 07/06/12 6:26am

OldFriends4Sal
e

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Don and Betty’s Paradise Lost

Entering its third season on a fresh wave of Emmy nominations, AMC’s Mad Men is the most stylish—and perhaps best—show on television. Inside its meticulous reconstruction of the precipice that was New York advertising circa 1960, where the men and women of Sterling Cooper smoke, drink, love, and lie, the author learns about the struggle of Mad Men creator (and former Sopranos writer) Matthew Weiner, the casting of Jon Hamm and January Jones as Don and Betty Draper, and the obsession that fuels each episode. Photographs by Annie Leibovitz.

Photograph by Gasper Tringale (Handy).

Jon Hamm and January Jones, channeling their Mad Men characters. Photographed at the Lightbourne House, in Lyford Cay, Nassau, the Bahamas. Photograph by Annie Leibovitz; styled by Michael Roberts.

Set in an advertising agency in the early 1960s, Mad Men debuted two summers ago and right off the bat earned itself two Golden Globes and a Peabody Award, and was nominated for 16 Emmys, becoming the first basic-cable series to win for outstanding drama. Its second season, no sophomore slump, has been nominated for another 16 Emmys, including best drama and four out of five possible writing nominations. A more interesting measure of the show’s impact is the fact that its title has become a kind of shorthand: you can now talk about a Mad Men skirt or lampshade or pickup line where once you might have used “space age” or “Kennedy era” or “Neanderthal.” But while the show, like its subject, has many surface pleasures—period design, period bad behavior (if you like high modernism, narrow lapels, bullet bras, smoking, heavy drinking at lunch, good hotel sex, and bad office sex, this is the series for you)—at its core Mad Men is a moving and sometimes profound meditation on the deceptive allure of surface, and on the deeper mysteries of identity. The dialogue is almost invariably witty, but the silences, of which there are many, speak loudest: Mad Men is a series in which an episode’s most memorable scene can be a single shot of a woman at the end of her day, rubbing the sore shoulder where a bra strap has been digging in. There’s really nothing else like it on television.

The central character is Don Draper, the cool and commanding creative director of the fictional Sterling Cooper agency. He’s a man in flight from his own past, a Gatsby-esque figure without the romance of a Daisy; or rather, he seems to be looking for a Daisy everywhere but his home in the suburbs, where his beautiful, bored, emotionally stunted wife, Betty, is stranded in what feels at times like an improbably compelling adaptation of The Feminine Mystique. Played in an instantly iconic performance by Jon Hamm, Don is a man whose emotions are in lockdown—a man as sleek and handsome and seemingly invulnerable as a hood ornament. But in the show’s central irony he is able to plumb human needs and desires with an artist’s intuition: if Mad Men ever approaches shtick, it’s when Don gets a faraway look in his eyes and somehow pulls a psychologically barbed selling point out of his own inner ether (a trope wonderfully parodied on Saturday Night Live last fall, when Hamm was hosting). In short, Don Draper is an advertising Mozart, or at least he’s the best Sterling Cooper has to offer, for another of the show’s ironies is that Don and his colleagues are dinosaurs not just in terms of the impending social revolutions of the 1960s but also in terms of the creative revolution that would roil advertising that decade. As in Hitchcock, the characters are unaware of shocks that the audience knows all too well lie ahead, whether they be the Kennedy assassination and women’s lib or long sideburns and the lasting influence of Doyle Dane Bernbach’s witty, self-deprecating “Lemon” ad for Volkswagen, which Don dismisses with the words “I don’t know what I hate about it the most.”

All in all, that’s a lot to pack into a mere 47 minutes of TV, one night a week—astonishing, really, considering that each episode of Mad Men, with its scrupulous period detail, is shot in just seven days on a budget that, at an average $2.8 million an episode this season, even a lot of indie-film producers would scoff at. But who knows? Going back to my original point, if Heaven’s Gate had been a 13-episode series with a hard-and-fast airdate, the last 30 years of Hollywood history might have been different, and Michael Cimino something other than the butt of a cautionary tale.

“I’m of the persuasion that budget constraints are very, very good for creativity. I think people having unlimited amounts of money makes you really lazy. And I will be quoted on that, believe it or not.” The speaker turning his back on decades of Hollywood wisdom was Matthew Weiner, 44, the auteur behind Mad Men, who also has a Sopranos pedigree, having written for that series during its final three seasons. As Mad Men’s creator and show-runner—the industry term for whoever has ultimate creative responsibility for a series, typically a writer- producer—he has imbued his own series with a similarly novelistic richness, scope, and meticulous sense of craft. He talks about “training the audience” to learn how to read the show, and says things like “It’s been a process for the audience to trust the show on some level, to think that we’re thinking about it as much as they hope we are.”

They are, all right. They’re thinking about it as much as even the most Mad Men–obsessed shut-in blogger could hope. You can glean this from watching the show, with its precise, even exacting style of acting and shooting—on Mad Men, the perfect prop can be the equivalent of a well-placed comma—but I had no real idea until I had a chance to visit the Mad Men offices and soundstages, which, aptly, are in a studio on the edge of downtown Los Angeles which was converted from a steel-and-glass Mad Men–era office building. A scene-setting anecdote everyone in the Mad Men orbit tells is how Weiner came onto the set one day and focused on some pieces of fruit he said were too large and shiny and perfectly formed; produce in the early 60s—period produce—wasn’t pumped up. Get smaller, dumpier fruit, he ordered. (Depending on who was telling me the story, from cast members to network executives, the offending produce morphed from apples to oranges to bananas, but Amy Wells, the set decorator, said definitively: it was apples.) In a similar vein, the show’s prop masters have been plagued by the steroidal dimensions of contemporary American pastry whenever a Sterling Cooper secretary needs to pick up a Danish from the coffee cart.

Mad Men's John Hamm and January Jones

“A lot of what I do with Betty is in the eyes,” says Jones. “A lot of the feelings are unspoken, so that’s kind of been fun to play with.” Photograph by Annie Leibovitz; styled by Michael Roberts.


Touched with the O.C.D.”

“Matt wants real,” said Charlie Collier, president of AMC. For Weiner, Collier continued, “it’s not television; it’s a world.” Perhaps the only other producer as committed to the rules of his imagined universe is George Lucas. “Perfectionism” is a word the show’s writers tossed around when I asked a group of them about working with Weiner. “Fetishism” was another. Alan Taylor, who has directed four episodes of Mad Men, labeled Weiner’s attention to detail “maniacal.” Call it what they will, it is a charge that is largely embraced. “We’re all a little bit touched with the O.C.D.,” Robin Veith, one of the writers, told me, describing how she and her colleagues have researched actual street names and businesses in Ossining, the suburb where Don and Betty live; checked old commuter-train schedules, so that they know precisely which train Don would take to the city; pored over vintage maps to learn which highways he would drive on.

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence
I will make you cyber shit in your pants!
What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In
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